This is a copy of the Soviet pennant that flew on the Luna 2 mission to the moon. This copy is on display at the Cosmosphere in Hutchinson, Kansas.

The Space Shot- Weekly Wrap Up for October 15th, 2017

Hey, everyone! Welcome to the weekly wrap up for The Space Shot, where I go through and round up my favorite content from the week. Be sure to listen to the podcast to get space science, history, and pop culture content in your podcast feed every day.

Today is the 20th anniversary of the launch of Cassini, the spacecraft that just completed its 13-year mission studying Saturn and its moons. The vast distances between Earth and Saturn meant that Cassini had to perform numerous gravity assists to reach the speeds necessary to get out to the outer planets. After a six and a half plus year cruise, Cassini-Huygens entered orbit around Saturn.

In January of 2005, the Huygens lander touched down on Titan, becoming the first spacecraft to land on a body in the outer solar system. The Huygens lander only operated for a short time before its batteries were expended. Cassini went on to study Saturn in incredible detail up until September 15th, 2017.

Here are some links to some that cover the Cassini-Huygens mission in detail.

https://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/cassini/main/index.html

https://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov/resources/7797/?category=videos

This article details the final moments of Cassini; it’s still hard to believe the mission has come to an end. https://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov/news/3126/reconstructing-cassinis-plunge-into-saturn/


The Space Shot just reached 150 episodes this week! Check out Episode 150 to learn about Pioneer 1, Apollo 7, and the 100th flight of the Space Shuttle program. Here’s the link to episode 150: https://thespaceshot.fireside.fm/150


Since we are on the topic of milestones, I have also started a podcast for the Cosmosphere in Hutchinson, Kansas. The Cosmosphere is home to some of the most incredible space artifacts in the solar system. The Apollo 13 Command Module Odyssey, the flight ready backup for Sputnik 1, the Gemini X Capsule, a Titan II rocket, the Liberty Bell 7 (currently on loan to another museum) and countless other American, German, Soviet, and Russian artifacts. The Cosmosphere houses the largest collection of former Soviet Union and Russian space artifacts in the United States.

The flight-ready backup for Sputnik 1 that Jim Remar, President and Chief Operating Officer at the Cosmosphere, and I discuss in Episode 1 of The Cosmosphere Podcast.

The featured image for this post is a copy of the Soviet pennant that flew on the Luna 2 mission to the moon in 1959. This pennant is on display at the Cosmosphere in Hutchinson, Kansas. Get to the Cosmosphere and check out this and other artifacts. If you can’t make it there just yet, download The Cosmosphere Podcast through iTunes or subscribe through your podcast app of choice.

iTunes: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/the-cosmosphere-podcast/id1292485164?mt=2

Web Streaming and RSS feed: https://cosmosphere.fireside.fm/episodes

Feeling mighty short under the mighty Titan II, the launch vehicle that sent American astronauts into space during the Gemini program.

To wrap it up I’ve got some SpaceX news. Earlier this week, SpaceX launched its 15th mission of the year and the third time that a Falcon 9 had been flown twice. SpaceX is making reusability a habit, and I like it. Here are the links to the webcasts for their launches last week:

Iridium-3: https://youtu.be/SB4N4xF2B2w

Echostar 105/SES-11: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iv1zeGSvhIw


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I will be posting these articles here and on Facebook every Sunday, so be sure to check back. The Space Shot and The Cosmosphere Podcast are both available in iTunes, so give them a listen.

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