Where Do We Put The UX Tasks?

Option 1: Keep UX work in a separate system

  • Pros: It keeps the ticketing system “clean and uncluttered.”
  • Con: No one knows what UX is working on, and it is impossible to view the dependencies. The backlog is obscured making it tough to get the “big picture”

Option 2: Track UX work in the ticketing system as distinct and separate tickets

  • Pros: A clear sense of WIP (work in progress), and the current burden on UX
  • Con: Too much clutter / too many tickets, and UX work often falls out of sync with release cycle

Option 3: Track UX as work related to user-focused tickets

  • Pros: Clearly describes dependencies. Allows for a “pull” system for design and research which promotes just-in-time work. Remains very user-goal focused
  • Cons: May require sub-tasks, and multiple people assigned to a particular ticket. Requires strong stories and story splitting practices
  1. Preventing unnecessary pre-work (we’ve all had efforts killed after being reassured that the work was, in fact, going to happen)
  2. Keeping the system clean
  3. Reflecting reality
  4. Clearly describing the value-stream, as work further to the right gets closer to release and customer outcomes
  5. Giving “credit” to UX for the work they do that goes unappreciated

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Multiple hat-wearer. Prod dev nut. I love wrangling complex problems and answering the why with qual/quant data. @johncutlefish on Twitter.

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John Cutler

John Cutler

Multiple hat-wearer. Prod dev nut. I love wrangling complex problems and answering the why with qual/quant data. @johncutlefish on Twitter.

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