Why Rotational from Tuxedo II is the Jam of the Summer

I’ve started my summer job this week, which brings with it hours upon hours of music and podcast explorations. My man DragonflyJonez from twitter said something about a band called Tuxedo. Something along the lines of the first album being flames and that a new one was coming soon. The first album, self-titled Tuxedo, was indeed straight flames. The type of jams that are best enjoyed in your Sunday best, a bottle of cognac and a dance floor. Funky with a capital F, U, N, K and Y. Bass lines that leave your face scrunched up the same way you look when mom cooked that good-good grub on Thanksgiving. Any of the hooks could be played over a James Bond shoot the bad guy and wrap his arm around the fine lady scene. Mayer Hawthorne (vocals) and Jake One (producer) both make each song an anthem of suave and bravado. And that’s just the first album…


Tuxedo II takes everything that made the first collaboration wonderful and does it again. The grooves and vocals are dangerously close to being audio warfare. The hypnosis of white man dancing I fall under each time I hear these tracks is a sight to behold, I’m sure. Three tracks in and I’m toggling between nodding my head and dancing around my room as per usual. Then Rotational came on. Y’all, this might be a perfect song. Running three and a half minutes, this song has everything you want in a summer jam. A hook that sinks into your mind without feeling like a parasite

“Round and round we go

(Round and round, round and round)

I can’t seem to get you off my mind

Hiding in the cold

(Up and down, all around)

Well I guess that’s just the way it rolls

Rotational”

This song hits me right where I live, sometimes feeling that my search for someone to care for me and I for them is a circular, unending process of hopes being built up then torn down. Rotational is the rare banger of a song that I can listen to and not have to turn my brain off to enjoy. Check it out below:

https://youtu.be/hViU11Bz3Mw

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