How to use namara.io — Part 6

Collections

To help us build apps and organize our data we use the collection feature on namara.io. There are two ways to create a collection on namara.io. The first way is through the profile page menu.

You’ll notice in the bottom right corner of the screen there is a blue circle. If you click this blue circle, you’ll be prompted by our ‘create a collection’ dialog.

Enter the title of your collection, descriptions are optional, and choose whether or not you’d like other users to be able to access your collection by making it private or public. Then click the ‘create collection’ button and you’re good to start adding data sets.

The other way to create a new collection is directly from the search results page. Hover over a data set to reveal the blue buttons in the bottom right corner of the data set. The big blue button at the bottom of the button snowman will prompt a dialog with all your collections, while selecting one of the smaller two blue buttons will add the data set you are hovered over to one of your two most recent collections. In the case below, I added ‘Explosive Dumping Areas’ to ‘Collection 3’.

You should see this confirmation message at the top of your screen when you successfully add a data set to a collection.


To access your collections you can click on the avatar in the top right corner of the page, or hover over the avatar and click the collections link from the dropdown menu below.

This is what the collection page should look like when you arrive.

To visit a particular collection just click on whichever you’d like. Once on the collection page for let’s say ‘collection 3’, hover over a data set to add it to other collections or to delete it from the current collection.

The trash can in the top right corner of the screen below will delete the collection, while the pencil icon will allow you to edit the collection details including title, description, and whether or not the collection is private.


Now head on over to namara.io to start exploring open data.

That’s all folks.

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