THE PROBLEM WITH TODAY HORROR

BY

JORGE HARRINGTON

I just got done watching a movie, that was considered to be “Horror”. It was called Insidious. Before you go and burn me at the stake, hear me out. The Insidious franchise is going for their fourth installment in 2018, so no matter what I say, they will go ahead and make that movie.

The question I want to ask is, will it be rated R?

When I was growing up, almost any movie that was considered “Horror”, had a R rating. The movie Halloween was rated R. In my opinion, this movie was classic, but boring. Don’t get me wrong. I would shit my pants, if I saw a man walking the dark streets with a white mask. Masks and knives were the things that nightmares were made of.

Today the problem is . . . it’s the year 2017. If I saw a man walking down the street with a white mask, I would call 911 on my iPhone , and then film him for proof. Sure it would be scary, but it would be cool to go viral. We are running out of ideas.

Found footage film was a big thing back in 2009. But after so many found footage sequels, its not considered found footage anymore. Just plain footage. What is considered horror today? Two films come to mind when asking that question. Those two films are, Get Out and Don’t Breath. Both have an R rating.

R means that the movie is restricted (obviously). Which means it’s so scary, your not supposed to be watching it unless you are old enough.. Today, big budget horror movies that have are given a PG-13 rating. This means that anyone can see it. It’s friendly. It’s safe.

They’re getting money mixed up with art. They dumb down their audiences when they give horror movies a PG-13. They show all the scary parts in the trailer, making it boring. Jump scares every fifteen minutes (I counted), and open it up to the entire public. Missing the mark, entirely.

Horror movies today, don’t have any mystery. Some character in the movie always knows what or why the monster is does, what it does.

The movie Jaws, is the best example of creating mystery around a monster. The whole movie, they talked about how big the shark is. It can swallow a man whole. It can tear boats apart. When the final reveal happens, you can’t help but agree. That’s a big shark. Suddenly, the professional shark catcher starts to get doubtful.

Last bit about horror. I believe horror has to have character development. Slasher movies are no more, because when we see fictional teenagers getting killed by a man in a mask, that nobody knows who they are. They deserve to be cut into bits. It must have a mixture of other genres too. The movie Crimson Peak, was horror mixed with love. The movie Krampus, was mixed with comedy. If you have horror mixed with horror, you get a movie directed by Rob Zombie. I enjoy his movies, but I know they are definitely not for everyone.

If you liked what you read, you can find other works by the author here, here, and here.

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