Deriding the police hurts the people Labour is trying to help most

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Graffiti reading “1312 — ACAB” (1312 represents the alphabetically listed letters of ACAB)

‘ACAB’ (‘All Cops Are Bastards’) is everywhere I go. As a feeling, as a spoken thought, as graffiti on a half dozen walls I see each day. The paint is fading on some; on others, it is clear and cuts through the art surrounding it, the message typically in simple lines, the letters without style. It’s not a phrase for prettying up, it’s a hardened statement.

And it’s one Labour musn’t dare touch. Rather, not in its literal sense, nor its intended one. Strangely, the litany of slogans challenging the police, new and old, seem never to mean what they say. The prominent ‘Defund the Police’ line, for example, really means ‘re-allocate funding away from the police and into under-funded public services.’


James Baldwin’s groundbreaking novel can teach us so much about love, limits, and action. There’s never been a better time to read it.

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I’ll tell you the truth, not because I want to but because if I don’t you’ll recognise me for what I am: a man who read a James Baldwin novel, and who wants to talk about it somehow.

More than a man who read that novel, I’m a white man, in a time where my sort ought to listen more than try to figure this situation out. And I wouldn’t dream of figuring anything out here; really, I just want to show off the high school English skills I’ve managed to keep with me.

Right now, it feels like we’re stuck in our own small spaces, trying to work our ways out of a whole lot we’ve built up around ourselves. …


In his five years at the helm, the former Labour Leader lost all ability to read the country’s mood

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Corbyn always liked to bring a letter to Prime Minister’s Question’s: he had no end of them prepared to face down the three Tory Prime Ministers he stood against in the Commons. Someone, somewhere, would write to him, and he in turn passed their questions right to Cameron, to May, and for those last months of his leadership, to Johnson.

It was a very Corbyn thing to do, democratising the process, taking questions otherwise left hanging in the air or, worse, losing their way in the thick of Twitter, and putting queries of any and all matters right in the face of the PM. …


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What role the opposition has to play in a time like this is always tough to figure. It’s the decision nobody wants to make: whether to take the route favoured by the left wing of the Labour Party, and lambast the government at every opportunity for its failures, or to take the route Keir Starmer has chosen, to fall back and speak up only when things really start to fall apart.

The debate is mostly an intra-party one, with the public at large never caring much for the problems within a political party save for the really juicy stuff. This is prime time for Starmer to make a good first impression with the public, but how he calms the factions within his party and settles (or fails to settle) them with his response will not reach most of Britain. …


Keir Starmer and the Labour Party have their chance to make a first impression - it remains to be seen how they’ll use it.

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Jeremy Corbyn (L) and Labour Leader Sir Keir Starmer (R)

Britain and the Labour Party, have themselves a new normal. The Corbyn era is over, and the moderate parts of Labour have to pick up the remains of the far-left’s long shot at power: barely two-hundred seats in Parliament, trust lost among lifelong party supporters, and a decimated English heartland. …


The presumptive Labour leader will have a fight to even be noticed amidst the present crises

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Why anyone should want to lead the Labour Party is a mystery. Apart from Rebecca Long-Bailey, sure to champion an unelectable cause into the ground, the remaining candidates have put themselves up for a fearsome task.

Among their responsibilities: reassuring Jewish voters they will be safe under a Labour government, cooling factional disputes ranging up and down every part of Great Britain and through every level of the party, reviving the lagging party presence in Scotland and Wales, charming the Northern heartland all over again, putting the image of Corbyn aside, and now more than ever, being listened to. …


And so long as Bernie’s out of the picture, they just don’t care.

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Last week I predicted a good Super Tuesday for Bernie. Enough said about that.

It’s hard, looking ahead, seeing Biden rack up huge leads in state after state, toppling Bernie’s odds and becoming the clear frontrunner to take the nomination and go up against Trump. Hard not because I have a problem with Biden particularly, but because I know this means four more years of Trump, and I know most of the high-profile figures endorsing Biden are happy to see Trump in the White House again over Sanders.

However drastic that sounds, consider: Biden stands up for busing, yet Kamala endorses him; Biden votes against gay marriage, yet Buttigieg goes in for him too; there are reasons myriad why Klobuchar and O’Rourke and Booker shouldn’t like Biden, but since Super Tuesday they have lined up behind the former Vice-President as the man they supposedly believe will see Trump out of power and usher in a wave of sensible, Democratic, democratic government. …


So long as his backers comprehend what happened in South Carolina, Bernie’s future looks bright

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Bernie Sanders (above)

The facts: Biden did well in South Carolina, everyone else did poorly, and this was expected of everyone else, except for Bernie Sanders.

The first point is in no doubt. Scoring more than forty-eight per cent of the vote, Biden won South Carolina by a larger margin than Bernie Sanders did Nevada, his blow-out win from a week before. …


The Southern state will be no easy battleground for the Vermont Senator

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Bernie Sanders (above) has not yet faced a challenge in this primary like he will this Saturday in South Carolina

I won’t predict the surge of Bernie Sanders will end, and I don’t recommend anyone else does, either. God only knows that’s been proven a mug’s game, with analyst after analyst proven some measure of deluded about their belief the Vermont Senator will have to falter at some point. No, best we presume he hasn’t hit his ceiling yet, and that he will see a relatively easy journey coming into Super Tuesday. …


The choice for the ‘sensible’ candidate is an important one, and Lisa Nandy just doesn’t make the cut

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Labour leadership hopeful Lisa Nandy (above)

Coming off the latest round of debates, the candidate to succeed Jeremy Corbyn as leader of the Labour Party are falling into their roles. Promising to offer Corbyn a role in her shadow Cabinet, insisting our problem alone was a failure to communicate the brilliance of our last manifesto, and carrying on the miserable tone the far-left adores, Rebecca Long Bailey has cemented herself as a candidate unwilling to compromise. …

About

Joseph Crossley

Political blogger from England. Trying to explain politics in simple language. Follow me on twitter at: https://twitter.com/_josephcrossley

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