New Project: Stash

For the longest time, I’ve had this recurring issue of finding anywhere to micromanage important pieces of documentation; finding difficulty in the things that I want to save for later. Years, maybe just months, or even a couple days. Receipts recording purchases of over a hundred spent on a particular item or something due for a possible return, subscription invoices as each payment happens, storing the tickets for an upcoming festival or cinema showing, or even tracking the utility bills. I have things I need to keep safe, as most do, but nowhere handy to keep them.

Being an aspiring web developer, it is in my interest to solve problems that don’t have an accessible solution physically through technology; by building alternative solutions myself, with my own skills.

This is a problem for me; a serious problem. Storing things with credit card details scrawled across rolled up paper sat in a quick-fix plastic bag in the corner of a room I’d hope nobody’d wander into, or stabbed to a cork board on show to anyone who did actually did; as you can imagine, is not a preferable solution . Lots of those available were more of a hindrance than an assistance in keeping the purchase’s details within reach.


Being an aspiring web developer, it is in my interest to solve problems that don’t have an accessible solution physically through technology; by building alternative solutions myself, with my own skills. Luckily, right around the time I was getting tired of the aforementioned solution, I was right in the midst of studying all aspects of the popular Node concurrency run time, after essentially mastering front-end JavaScript. Hand-in-hand with the renowned Electron framework for building cross-platform desktop applications (used by web companies such as Slack, Discord, and Twitch), the combination provides a powerful platform at my disposal. I’ll leave the discussion of those tools for another time, though it’s safe to say that they deserve all the praise they receive.

This is where I introduce Stash. With aforementioned tools plus a bunch of popular plugins, I intend to build a rich desktop application that can assist me with my plagued money micromanaging agenda: it can show me what payments I have coming up, what events [that i have tickets for] are happening soon, what subscription or bill is due, and how amount spent all adds up; storing every little detail I or any other user deems necessary to keep, within the limitations of the implementation.

I want to provide something developers can hack into, tear apart, and contribute to — want a section for writing secret notes? Go ahead, add it.

For myself as a user, this experience is sounding great. Give me ten! … Jokes aside, there is more to this. Realistically, I could ask anyone to put together a simple desktop program/application, regardless of if it takes ten minutes to open. It opened, it showed me things, it’s admittedly a solution… kinda. Fellow developers, we’re talking Windows Forms speed, because we recall building those things. Whether that solution would be an improvement upon those I’ve managed without technology is a question for later. Now, however, I see reason to point out the need for cause behind my effort: why should i make it? To answer this is rather simple.

Whilst providing a solution for users, I want to provide something developers can hack into, tear apart, and contribute to — want a section for writing secret notes? Go ahead, add it. By making the project open source, and laying foundations with easily alterable mechanisms; nothing’s incredibly tied, nothing’s interwoven, it all communicates appropriately and is therefore interchangeable as another developer may deem fit.

Time to get started, I’d say.


See my progress on Github

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