Resilience and sport: Neurophysiology and readiness, rather than mental toughness and grit

Figure 1: The ventromedial prefrontal cortex (VmPFC) appears to be implicated in maladaptive coping behaviors. The neuroflexibility of the VmPFC may be a major determinant of a person’s resilience and capacity to cope with stress. (See: Sinha, R., Lacadie, C. M., Constable, R. T., & Seo, D. (2016). Dynamic neural activity during stress signals resilient coping. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 113(31), 8837–8842.)
Figure 2: Hormesis and exercise. Regular exercise elicits hormesis, reduces oxidative stress, protects against disease onset and progression, and improves performance and quality of life. Strenuous exercise and overtraining increases oxidative stress and the risk for diseases. However, an oxidative stress status that is too low leads to a lack of benefits related to hormesis and may be detrimental for health. Ox, oxidative; ROS, reactive oxygen species. (See: Pingitore, A., Lima, G. P. P., Mastorci, F., Quinones, A., Iervasi, G., & Vassalle, C. (2015). Exercise and oxidative stress: Potential effects of antioxidant dietary strategies in sports. Nutrition, 31(7), 916–922.)
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John Sullivan

John Sullivan

Dr. John Sullivan is a Sport Scientist and Clinical Sport Psychologist https://about.me/