This essay is the final of a six-part series documenting lessons learned from my time at Electric Objects.

Writing and publishing these essays has been cathartic. The process has helped me find clarity in an otherwise murky experience, and I’m glad to hear from other founders that the series has resonated with them.

The mistakes that I’ve documented in this series didn’t do us any favors, but what the story of Electric Objects ultimately boils down to is a failure to find a market willing to adopt our product at the pace required to justify our business model.

Looking back…


This essay is the fifth in a series documenting lessons learned from my time at Electric Objects. Follow me on Medium to find out when the next essay is published.

In a recent email exchange with one of my former teammates, we reflected on the caliber of people we were able to assemble at Electric Objects. Bringing this group together is probably what I’m most proud of, and I’ll be lucky to work with a team that brilliant, that creative, and that passionate again.

Even so, it probably won’t surprise anyone that one of my major lessons has to do…


This essay is the fourth in a series documenting lessons learned from my time at Electric Objects. Follow me on Medium to find out when the next essay is published.

In response to yesterday’s essay about belief and venture capital, Hunter Walk posed a great question that I thought would be useful to share with those following along.

Knowing this, would you have funded EO differently from the start? Would you have *not* done EO? …


This essay is the third in a series documenting lessons learned from my time at Electric Objects. Follow me on Medium to find out when the next essay is published.

In The New New Thing, Michael Lewis follows Jim Clark in the late 90’s through the creation of three multi-billion dollar businesses. Clark’s process looked like this: he dreamed of a new world in which the company he was building lived at the center — “a state of pure possibility.” In exchange for a part of that dream, venture capitalists gave Clark some money. The money attracted more money. …


This essay is the second in a series documenting lessons learned from my time at Electric Objects. Follow me on Medium to find out when the next essay is published.

Electric Objects was born out of a problem that I encountered and felt personally.

The first inkling of the idea, early 2013.

After this tweet, in subsequent conversations with friends, and in the early prototyping process, I found others like me who shared this need, who felt this problem deeply, and who were thrilled with the promised solution: a digital display that behaved like the paintings and photographs on our…


This essay is the first in a series documenting lessons learned from my time at Electric Objects. Follow me on Medium to find out when the next essay is published.

The challenging reality of building a hardware business is that growth is expensive. Each new customer acquired today costs money three months ago. Crazy, right? Turns out that’s how businesses have worked for hundreds of years, until software.

There are exactly three ways to finance the growth of a hardware business:

  1. Customers: You crowdfund or bootstrap your way to your first production batch, and money from that first batch funds…


I spent an incredible four years of my life working on Electric Objects. It was an exercise of passion, a product that needed to exist, and it brought together an extremely talented group of people that I was lucky to call my teammates.

The company didn’t begin at a white board but at an empty wall and a need to fill it. It began in 2013 in a small room in the house on the Cape where I grew up. I was spending a lot of time on the Cape then — my mom had recently been diagnosed with cancer…


Today we’re announcing that the Electric Objects App has been acquired by GIPHY! This good news comes with a bittersweet milestone — after four years, we have decided to shut down the Electric Objects hardware business. While GIPHY will not sell or support new Electric Objects hardware, they are committed to maintaining the EO App for existing customers. For more details on the transition, visit our FAQ.

GIPHY’s commitment to the arts is unparalleled in the technology industry, and we couldn’t ask for a better home for the EO collection and our inspiring community of artists and art fans.

GIPHY…


“The artist is always engaged in writing a detailed history of the future because she is the only person aware of the nature of the present” — Wyndham Lewis

Most of us can name our favorite bands, or list our favorite songs. We can tell you our favorite films, our favorite directors. We can even name them according to different periods in our lives. We can give you a top ten list of our favorite books, including the last great one that we read. …


This morning we released a new feature for Electric Objects. With Playlists, Electric Objects users can create lists of your favorite artworks from Art Club, or from the community, and set your EO1 to rotate through them every 30 minutes, every hour, every 12 hours or every 24 hours. We think you’ll love it, and are confident that it will make Electric Objects an even more welcome addition to your home.

“Slideshows are not as cool as you think.” — Electric Objects FAQ, 2014

But you may recall that when we launched, we were pretty set against anything that looked like a “slideshow.” We felt that it offered an opportunity for distraction, and…

Jake Levine

Product @facebook / @oculus. Past: PM @square, founder & CEO @electricobjects, GM @digg and @betaworks. Fascinated by what humans do with the internet.

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