If you’re developing a React Native app on an Android device then you know this story.

You’re sitting there holding your $500 phone plugged in to your $2,000 MacBook and you need to reload the app. So you shake it. You’re nervous because you probably shake it 300 times a day and one of these days it’s going to slip and now you’re out $2,500. The worrying makes your hands sweaty, only increasing the likelihood of a slip-up, so you get even more nervous and… well, you get the idea.

Here’s a nifty trick to prevent that from happening, and…


This guide is Part Two in our four-part series Using React Native in an Existing iOS App. Click here for Part One: Getting Started.

Now that we have the ability to use a React Native View anywhere in our app, we need to be able to render different views for different use cases. In other words, we need a router. For this we’ll use the <Navigator /> component provided by RN.

Originally our two native buttons rendered the same RN View. …


This guide is Part One in our four-part series Using React Native in an Existing iOS App. Click here for Part Two: Dynamic Routing.

Two months ago, we at delivery.com released our new iOS app. With so many web-turned-mobile developers on the iOS team, we were incredibly excited about the possibility of building new views using JavaScript. One month ago, we released our first three React Native views into production. This guide can help you do the same.

RN has a getting started guide, which this closely follows. But in addition to getting an RN View rendered inside your existing…


Without Tables

Using Column-Count (in angular)

<table></table>

I cringe when I see that. I’m not sure if that’s justified. I’m not even sure why. But at some point I was taught to never use <table> and it just stuck with me. Maybe there are still good uses for the table element. I haven’t come across any so I’ve had no reason to do any research on the topic.

But I was recently asked to organize some elements into columns and rows, and I worried that the easiest way to do this was with a <table>. To my surprise I came across a few new CSS3 properties…


Using Chrome’s Developer Console

I’m a relative newcomer to the world of front end development. I shudder to think of what life was like before the days of the magical Chrome console. I probably spend 50% of my day using it, and learn a new trick every week (now every day: http://devtoolstips.com/).

Last week I wrote a function that processed some data every time a user clicked on an element before re-rendering it on the screen. There was a noticeable delay in the rendering but it was tough to determine if this was caused by the data…

Jesse Sessler

Front End / Mobile developer @deliverydotcom.

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