Trello is the perfect tool for organizing your tech job search. Today I’m sharing a template board and card, and how I use them to stay on top of multiple opportunities.

Trello job search board in progress, with company names obscured
Trello job search board in progress, with company names obscured
Trello board in progress

After getting laid off due to COVID-19, I’m on my next big round of job searching. I’m a full-time remote iOS engineer, which is a somewhat niche field, so it can take a bit longer to find a good fit. I’ve been using Trello for years to organize smaller projects, and find it’s a great tool for job searching. …


A practical guide to building a list of interview questions based on your dream job criteria.

This is an update of a previous post: Questions I’m (also) asking at tech interviews

“WOC in Tech Chat” by WOCinTech is licensed under CC BY 2.0

Let’s not kid ourselves, the tech interview process is rough. Being armed with a list of things that you find most important in a job, and questions for evaluating potential employers can simplify the process and provide more quantifiable data. Here are some actionable steps for defining your dream job, and creating questions that will help you evaluate your potential employers:

  • Define what a “dream job” means to you…


Small tips to customize Xcode for a smoother experience.

This post is part of an ongoing series on setting up an iOS development environment.

Xcode customization is highly dependent on personal preference, and there are infinite combinations of things that you can do to improve your experience. Here are a few of my favorite tips to enhance your Xcode.

Upgrade your theme:

If you aren’t a fan of any of the built-in Xcode themes, you can easily import new themes. This is a good starter resource:

In addition to importing themes, you can easily customize a theme and save it or export it…


Get your git game on

This post is part of an ongoing series on setting up an iOS development environment.

The focus of this article is less about “how to git”, and more to share some useful tools and tweaks that I use regularly to make my dev life run a little more smoothly.

The basics:

This post assumes you have Homebrew installed (please see this previous post if not). To install git, simply run:

brew install git

If you need help learning git, Github & Code School have created a great basic tutorial, with more advanced tutorials available from Code School…


iTerm + zsh + Prezto + Powerlevel9k

This post is part of an ongoing series on setting up an iOS development environment.

iTerm (Chalkboard theme), zsh via Prezto (Powerline9k theme), DejaVu Sans Mono for Powerline Nerd Font Complete

Over time, I’ve tweaked my terminal to provide a good deal of relevant information that’s easy to parse, right when and where I need it. At the end of the day, I have a system where I can easily tell which version control system I’m using, which branch I’m in, and my status (files unstaged, files staged but not commited, etc). I can quickly navigate to to other branches or files using auto-completion and suggestion that’s built into…


This post is part of an ongoing series on setting up an iOS development environment.

Default SublimeText theme ‘Amy’

Installation

Download and install SublimeText directly from the website. Sublime is free to download and evaluate, but should be purchased for continued use. I say should because while you can evaluate indefinitely, a lot of work went into Sublime and supporting excellent work means more goodies for all. If you are not able to purchase at the time of download, you will see an occasional pop-up requesting the user purchase Sublime.

Preferences → Settings allows fine-grained control of your Sublime installation. …


Start with a clean slate, and add essentials: rvm, npm, homebrew

This post is part of an ongoing series on setting up an iOS development environment.

The last time I set up my iOS environment, my Mac had been used for years as a student machine. I had failed or partial installs for dozens of tutorials. I had SDKs for languages I was never going to touch again. Before I began setting up the environment, I cleaned up and cleared out all the old apps and installations that I could. …


A short(ish) and sweet list of applications that I use on a regular basis for iOS development and regular life. I’m open to trying new or alternative applications as I come across them, but have found that these are the apps that I continue to rely upon to create an efficient and effective work environment.

This post is part of an ongoing series on setting up an iOS development environment.

  • Alfred — Alfred is a productivity app for MacOS that streamlines app launching, searching, hot keys and text expansion (free, upgradable for Powerpack)
  • AppCleaner — Utility for cleanly and safely…

Jen Hamilton

iOS dev & curious person | jshamilton.net

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