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Horizen recently released a highly innovative sidechain protocol. Here, I cover sidechains and the Zendoo protocol.

This article is part of the Horizen Academy expert content and the chapter “What is a blockchain?

Blockchain technology offers some unique properties, such as achieving consensus among unknown actors and providing a strong incentive mechanism for honest behavior. However, building real-world applications on blockchain technology can be challenging.

The first challenge of building applications on the blockchain is security. A blockchain’s security increases as the number of network participants grow. …


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A blockchain can do more than simply storing data; it can also run software — meet smart contracts.

This article is part of the Horizen Academy expert content and the chapter “What is a blockchain?”.

If you feel like there is more information in this article than you need, consider reading the advanced level version of it. It conveys the same concepts but in less detail and complexity.

Many people have said it and so do I: smart contracts are neither smart nor contracts. In most general terms they are pieces of software on a blockchain. A smart contract needs to be written in a specific language defined by the protocol of the blockchain it lives on.

A contract can be defined as an agreement between parties that binds them to something happening in the future. The term “smart” comes from the automatic execution of these digital “contracts”. …


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Thanks to Christine Roy

Spoken language, the internet, and blockchains can be understood as network protocols. Each is used within a group of participants — the network — to achieve a common goal.

This article is part of the Horizen Academy expert content and the chapter “What is a blockchain?”.

If you feel like there is more information in this article than you need, consider reading the beginner or advanced level version of it. They convey the same information, but in less detail and complexity.

In this article, we want to account for the multidisciplinary nature of the blockchain. Without the right incentive system and economic considerations global digital money cannot work. …


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Image by Free-Photos

Blockchain isn’t as complex as you think! Technically, it’s just a fancy way to store data. Fancy how? Find out in this article!

This article is part of the Horizen Academy expert content and the chapter “What is a blockchain?”.

If you feel like there is more information in this article than you need, consider reading the beginner or advanced level version of it. They convey the same concepts, but in less detail.

The first use case for blockchain technology was digital money. To have a monetary system without central control, you must have a special and sophisticated way to handle all the data produced with each transaction. Imagine if every person could access and modify the databases kept by banks. …


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There’s a way to own a piece of your favorite sports team and all you have to know is in this article

Who should become the team’s next manager? What should next season’s jersey look like? Imagine you could impact your favorite sports team’s decisions and your voice was heard and considered.

Imagine you could share victories with your favorite team — not just emotionally, but also financially. You’d be able to participate in the monetary success in the same way currently reserved to large investors and stakeholders.

Imagine the fan experience would truly match the level of innovation the sports business demonstrates in other areas like game analytics. …


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Max Morlock, Worldcup 1954, Foto: Imago

Why STOs can offer many benefits to professional sports clubs, athletes and fans alike

While the tokenization of assets has been discussed for years by the people working with blockchain technology, the idea seems to finally have escaped the bubble it was conceived in and is being considered by many different industries. The real estate sector was an “early adopter” but the sports industry is following closely.

When we say tokenization is a hot topic in the sports business world, we are talking about many different verticals. Some examples include:


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A quick update on the progress of the Horizen Developer Environment

The Horizen Developer Environment (HDE) was announced in August and we have been busy working on it since. The idea behind the HDE is to make it easy for developers to get started contributing to the Horizen ecosystem.

After the announcement, many developers reached out and confirmed our initial hypothesis: the barrier to entry for OSS contributions is quite high. Although some of the developers that reached out have years of job experience, they were struggling to find a good starting point for their first open-source contribution.

When asked why they had not contributed to OSS projects before, despite their interest, a lack of confidence and incentives to get involved were common answers. Other reasons included not understanding how the contribution process works and indecisiveness about which project to contribute to. …


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Thanks, Marko! :)

Looking at trends and creating win-win scenarios for open-source developers and open-source software projects alike.

Software is eating the world — and at an increasing speed. Not everybody needs to become a developer but there are certainly more arguments for than against being able to navigate the digital realm with confidence.

The world not only needs developers but also people feeling confident about how software works, how it is built and what challenges are associated with building it. A great way of getting to know what software development means, is getting involved in the world of open-source software (OSS) development. …


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Source

The journey from an empty folder to an online academy on blockchain tech, online privacy and more.

This article is meant to describe my personal experience with building the Horizen Academy. I want to state upfront that the entire process was a team effort. I had the help of our lovely graphic designer, Linda, Tuan, an incredibly talented web developer, and Erica who did a great job with the proofreading process. Additionally, I want to thank Mac and Gus for their continuous support, as well as the rest of the team for helping out whenever needed!

It was almost exactly one year ago that I got in contact with the ZenCash project. I joined the team’s BD division a little later in April 2018 before their rebrand to Horizen in August 2018. …


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A promising approach to building on top of existing first-layer protocols — a summary of the whitepaper for readers with a general understanding of blockchain technology.

You can find Part 1 of this article here.

Many people don’t have the necessary time or motivation to work themselves through whitepapers but nonetheless want to stay up to date with current developments in the blockchain sphere and have a general understanding of the technology. For those, I want to provide an overview of what sidechains are, why a number of teams are looking into them (Part 1) and how the sidechain implementation that Horizen is proposing works (Part 2).

TL;DR: The Engineering team at Horizen led by Alberto Garoffolo has proposed a new sidechain construction in a recent whitepaper based on proof-of-stake principles. The main innovation is a new backward transfer protocol, that allows transactions from one of the possibly many sidechains back to the mainchain, without the mainchain having to track the sidechain and without introducing a centralized federation of validators. While a reference implementation of a sidechain consensus protocol will be provided, a wide range of sidechain consensus protocols will be possible. …

About

Jonas Rubel

Liquiditeam Co-Founder | Horizen Community Contributor | Coinmonks Writer | Untitled-INC Member

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