Voting, in the City and Elsewhere

I wonder why we are okay with this.

In the town where I live, we have skyrocketing housing prices, rapidly expanding homeless camps, gang violence, and a stadium that lost its NHL farm team. Despite this, the voter turnout for our municipal election was only 35%. So for 65% of the 141,000 people who live here, this is all a perfectly fine outcome. Most of the people voted in were incumbents. It could have been worse, many of the new anti-SOGI trustee candidates did not get in, but other conservative candidates held on to their positions. It just boggles my mind that most people in my hometown could not be moved to take 10 minutes and vote.

I wonder if this is what true privilege looks like. To be so far removed from the decisions governing your life that anything short of a military coup d’etat couldn’t get you out to the polls. Then again, are we so beaten down by the crime and poverty that we just accept it as a part of life?

I’m probably thinking too hard about this. The truth is, city politics is just not exciting enough for most people. The CBC ran episode of “Murdoch Mysteries” instead of the Toronto election results, and the stakes were far higher for that contest.

It just feels lonely more than anything. I like the idea that I have a say in the way government is run. All that boring stuff creates decisions that fundamentally change our lives and that’s exciting. I don’t feel like I can shame people for not voting if they don’t feel represented. God knows I don’t feel represented every time I head to the polls. But if this isn’t working, we need to have better options than just being ruled over by decree.


Originally published at James-Strocel.com.