A Day in the Life of Age 61

age
60 years ago

Age, aging, aged.

This morning, just as I considered my new age of 62, I turned on my computer, selected Facebook, and read the popup window: “Today is Judy Haselhoef’s 61st birthday.” I considered its accuracy. 1955–2000: 45 years plus 2000–2016: 16 years. Hmmm. 61. I really thought I was 62. I felt great, losing another year.

Later, I noticed the Google search page is covered in birthday cakes. Is that just for me? Did you have the same page on August 16?

When the mail came, I opened a manilla envelope addressed to me from my dear friend, Jennifer. I expected she’d remember my new age and send me a birthday card. Instead, she had enclosed the summer issue of Live Well Magazine and marked page 8 — an article on hip replacement.

In the afternoon, I tried to make an appointment for vaccinations for our overseas travel. The receptionist indicated the clinic couldn’t provide to individuals over the age of 60 preventatives for malaria and yellow fever — too risky. (She recommended a different clinic with different policies). Then, I ordered insurance for the trip. The insurer advised it will not insure individuals over 70. I have only nine years to see the world before I settle down.

Tonight I have some reading to do:

Hacks Can Ease The Trials of Aging
 How Medical Science Hopes to Slow Down Aging
 Ageing and Oral Health: A New Paradigm Of Health

Tomorrow I will begin updating a short video I created 11 years ago about turning 50. It needs a significant do-over now that I have a new age.


Is every birthday this easy? What did you think about your last annual celebration?


Your thoughts and opinion are always welcome by commenting below or emailing johaselhoef@gmail.com.

Judy O Haselhoef, a social artist, story-teller, and author of “GIVE & TAKE: Doing Our Damnedest NOT to be Another Charity in Haiti,” blogs regularly at her website, www.JOHaselhoef.com.

Copyright @2016: If you’d like to use any part of it (up to 200 words), please give full attribution and this website, www.JOHaselhoef.

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