Photo by Senad Palic on Unsplash

Karlos K. Hill spoke with the MSU community in a zoom webinar about his recent comic, The Murder of Emmett Till: A Graphic History.

Karlos spoke with the Graphic Possibilities crew about the life and legacy of Emmett; bearing witness to and doing deep justice work to narratives of racial violence; the absolute necessity of community-engaged scholarship; and enhancing the pedagogical opportunities to graphic histories with archival, supplementary, and educational materials.

This episode was part of our 2021 webinar series. The record strove to preserve the conversation format as much as possible. Give it a listen!

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Photo by Mahdiar Mahmoodi on Unsplash

One of my activities as a professor at Michigan State University is leading the Graphic Possibilities Research Workshop (GPRW). Our workshop is one of several supported by the Department. The GPRW supports a podcast that is focused on speaking with comics educators, makers, and scholars from around the world. We started the podcast in the wake of the pandemic and we have been pleased by the engagement we’ve gotten from our community at MSU and beyond.

Check out this selection of episodes from the first season.

Visit the Graphic Possibilities website to learn more about the ways we are exploring comics.

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Virtual Exhibition of Beyond the Black Panther

In 2021, I was lucky enough to curate an exhibition exploring Afrofuturism in American comics. Most people are familiar with Marvel’s Black Panther, and some are aware of its connections to Afrofuturism, a framework to understand how the black imagination manifests visions of freedom. Beyond the Black Panther: Visions of Afrofuturism in American Comics offers both a virtual and physical exhibition exploring how themes such as aesthetics, Black feminism, and community, common to Afrofuturism, shape contemporary Black comics. Beyond the Black Panther gives us a view of stories inspired by African folklore such as Is’nana the Were-Spider, science fiction adventures centered on a black female hero such as Matty’s Rocket, or vital social commentary about police violence such as I am Alfonso Jones.

You can view the virtual exhibition below.

You can view one of my gallery talks about the exhibition below.

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