After three events and several one-on-one conversations we are starting to see clear next steps. Over time these steps will help to paint a clearer picture of the state of our digital economy and what we can do to create new opportunities and collaborate with each other.

Step 1: Narrow our geographic range to Burlington and Winooski (to start). As we fine tune the process we hope to expand to places to Colchester, Essex, Milton and more.

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VELCO map overview

Step 2: Pull existing reports, statistics, polls and visualizations into a virtual library. This is a collective effort. People from institutions like universities…


As a new Vermont resident I am learning new things everyday about the increasing number of local resources, organizations, initiatives and services that are available to local residents. In Chittenden county where I live there is a unique blend of diverse communities including an increasing number of New Americans, University Students, Retirees, Veterans and Remote Workers. This unique mix of people, culture and perspective has fueled my curiosity to learn more.

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Notes documented by @lgdavitian

With help from several friends I recently hosted a public event to discuss current and potential ways to bridge the digital divide that are unique to the resources and…


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State of the Internet participants at Study Hall co-working space in Burlington, Vermont.

On Thursday, October 19 I joined local stakeholders in Burlington, Vermont to discuss the state of the Internet and how it impacts Vermont residents. We explored how key issues described in Mozilla’s Internet Health Report affect the diverse communities in and around Burlington. We identified local strengths, weaknesses, and disparities related to these issues and brainstormed what steps we can take to address gaps and vulnerabilities related to Internet Health locally.

The event took place during Burlington’s Innovation Week. The week celebrates entrepenuership and technology in the greater Burlington area. I hosted the event with Mary Danko, the Director of…


During the recent Mozilla Global Sprint hundreds (900ish) of people from around the world came together in person and virtually to share expertise, build on ideas and fork/pull/commit a lot of cool stuff on Github. I am excited to share my experience as a participant and some ideas about how we can build on this amazing event in the future.

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MakersJam travel kit from Mark Shillitoe’s Global Sprint project CC-BY-4.0

I am grateful to have participated in a variety of ways. By helping 14 project leads prepare for the sprint in Github Issues like this one I learned about new initiatives I could share back with the communities I belong…


Please note: This article is cross-posted on the DOT and Mozilla Medium publication.

Last month my colleague, Amira Dhalla and I had the honor of joining over 150 young leaders from 10+ different countries for a three day Unconference about collaboration, digital literacy, localization, civic engagement and entrepreneurship. Participants led workshops, facilitated maker spaces, demonstrated new inventions, networked with each other, performed cultural dances and much more. It took place in the beautiful town of Nyamata, Rwanda. Digital Opportunity Trust (DOT) did a stellar job organizing the event and successfully brought everyone together for a fun-filled and inspiring three days.

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Unconference Participants in the form of the DOT logo. Photo by Digital Opportunity Trust.


Last month my colleague, Amira Dhalla and I had the honor of joining over 150 young leaders from 10+ different countries for a three day Unconference about collaboration, digital literacy, localization, civic engagement and entrepreneurship. Participants led workshops, facilitated maker spaces, demonstrated new inventions, networked with each other, performed cultural dances and much more. It took place in the beautiful town of Nyamata, Rwanda. Digital Opportunity Trust (DOT) did a stellar job organizing the event and successfully brought everyone together for a fun-filled and inspiring three days.

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Unconference Participants in the form of the DOT logo. Photo by Digital Opportunity Trust.

We’ve had the pleasure of working with DOT since early 2017 to increase…


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Global Sprint 2016, image from ContentMine

Join us and collaborate on open projects from around the world! Mozilla’s Global Sprint is a fun, fast-paced, two-day world-wide collaboration event where anyone — coders, designers, writers, artists, activists, educators, students — can pitch in to build and protect the open Web!

The Global Sprint originated with the Mozilla Science Lab (you can get a glimpse of a past MSL Sprint here); this year we’re going Network-wide.


I just got back from an inspiring visit to East Africa where I joined several colleagues from Mozilla and Digital Opportunity Trust (DOT) to work on a new project with people from Kenya, Tanzania, Rwanda, Jordan and Canada. Most of the work we did was in Nairobi and Dar Es Salaam with one short visit to Machakos. Below, I tried to capture some key experiences and learnings from the trip.

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Mozilla DOT Club participants with Club Leader Vincent Juma and Regional Coordinator Dome Dennis in Machakos, Kenya. CC-BY-SA by Mozilla

Project Background

In Collaboration with Digital Opportunity Trust (DOT) we are launching 30+ Mozilla Clubs in Jordan, Lebanon, Kenya, Rwanda and Tanzania over the next six months. Each country has leaders helping…


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Mozilla Clubs Leaders outside of the entrance to the Demystify the Web space at Mozfest.

The Mozilla Clubs presence and involvement at Mozfest this year left me feeling proud, motivated and inspired. 16 Club Leaders (Regional Coordinators and Club Captains) from across the world came together for one of Mozilla’s largest networking opportunities of the year. They joined more than 1800 people in a three day extravaganza of interactive sessions, hands-on activities and engaging talks. …


This blog post was co-authored by Zannah Marsh and Julia Vallera

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Ada Lovelace Portrait, Public Domain Alfred Edward ChalonScience & Society Picture Library

October 11 was Ada Lovelace Day, an annual celebration of the contributions of women to the fields of Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (also known as STEM). Born in 1815, Lovelace was given a rigorous education by her mathematician mother, and went on to devise a method for programming the Analytical Engine, a conceptual model for the first-ever general purpose computer. Lovelace (pictured here in full Victorian splendor) is known as the first computer programmer. This year, Ada Lovelace Day presented the perfect opportunity for Mozilla to engage community…

Julia Vallera

Knowledge seeker, open webber, collaborator, Mozilla alum, professor, artist, mountain biker, animal fanatic.

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