“Paint your Inner Drama”

It’s funny how you can spend most of your life swearing not to like/ want to do something, and then a series of events prompts you to take it up. Suddenly.

“Paint your inner drama”: a first visit to Tate Modern led to one of my best friends finding this quote tucked away in a book on sale. It has been a week but I haven’t been able to get that line out of my head. And so, I shall do as it says, once a week.

From my memory, I was always one of the worst painters in art classes. I haven’t picked up a paint brush or even mixed paint colours since I was 14. Yet, here I am picking up a paint brush (rather awkwardly), and putting it to the acrylic paper.

Behind each piece of my ‘inner drama’ which I will stick into the sketchbook shown above, I will write the date & time of painting, how I felt at that point in time, and some of the events that had happened before the painting (be it big or small events). This whole experiment is open, really. I’m not sure what painting once a week will do to (for) me. But there’s liberation in being a beginner and changing one’s habits. Mitchell Feigenbaum (who discovered the chaos theory) lived a 26-hour day just to put his mind in a state which he couldn’t have been, had he stuck to the usual 24 hours.

On page 11 of the book “The Art of Creative Thinking” by Rod Judkins (which I picked up at the Tate), this quote lies: “Whatever I know how to do, I’ve already done. Therefore I must always do what I do not know”- Eduardo Chillida.

Here goes to being open in 2016.

PS: You should watch the TED Talk on “Creative Confidence” by David Kelley of Ideo.

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