Ah, I do see where you’re coming from.
Tom Ritchford
11

Interesting points. Do you have any data regarding what you say about tech jobs? My friends in tech (in both NY and SF), none of whom are actually programmers, all make very high salaries working reasonable hours. So that is really where I was coming from with my points — I haven’t observed that professional folks have had anything snatched away from them, in reality I think they are the ones most uniformly benefitting from the country’s current economic system. This applies to myself and all who I know in such professional jobs, eg consulting, management, medecine, etc. But definitely open to seeing non-anecdotal data…especially curious about the salary piece as generally I’ve seen that salaries are good for business (or programming) roles in tech.

Job security in particular is an interesting piece with regards to the professional class. We don’t have any legal job security (most contracts are “at-will” that permit firings at any time without cause), but our scarcity provides a built-in job security. It costs a lot of money for a firm to find motivated professional workers. As I’ve advanced in my career I’ve even been surprised at the extent to which I have been able to negotiate so favorably with my employer, which happens because they can’t afford to hire somebody new.

Lastly I disagree with you about your last point. I think the working class, even if they’ve always had it bad, has plenty to complain about nowadays, and is being very vocal about their frustrations. Meanwhile, our professional class has it so good that they aren’t agitating for more, except for a few writers on Billfold ;)

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