6 business analyst best practices for newbies: requirements, interactive prototypes & more

From hi-fi prototyping to people management skills, newly qualified business analysts need these 6 best practices for software development projects

Getting started on any new career path can be challenging, and not a little daunting. Business analysis in a software context can be more challenging than most for first-timers. Business analyst roles are often loosely defined and require a heck of a skills soup — IT, project management, people management, business smarts, wireframing & prototyping… And that’s just for starters!

But new business analysts needn’t worry. Applying some business analysis best practices from the get-go will fire up any software engineering project you work on, and boost your career potential.

Check out Justinmind’s 8 tips for newbie business analysts who want to ensure successful software products and engineering projects.

Get a 360 degree view of your business analyst responsibilities

You won’t be expected to know everything up front and right away. But you should have 100% clear what business analysis entails and the tools/methodologies you’ll need to dominate in the future. Business analysis roles in software development projects or enterprises can vary surprisingly. How do you know what your personal role entails?

Business analysis roles in software development projects or enterprises can vary surprisingly. How do you know what your personal role entails?

Simple. Talk it out. If you’ve just started a new BA position, sit down with your Lead Business Analyst or direct manager, and get to grips with their expectations. If you’re managed by a fellow business analyst, ask them what their understanding of success in your role is. If you’re managed by a non-BA, what do they mean when they say ‘business analyst’. Do they want you to do data modelling or is that left to the DBAs? Do they want you to focus more on the business side or more on engineering?

And remember, you’re the person who has to understand the specific problem the software claims to solve, and convey that to the rest of the team throughout the project lifecycle.

Keep learning with business analysis courses

So you got a job, you can sit back and relax, right? Wrong. Continuous learning is expected in many workplaces, especially in fast-moving industries such as software development.

Sign up to any learning opportunities offered by your enterprise. This could be in-house workshops, online courses or sponsorship to attend relevant events.

In your downtime, check out business analyst courses that could supplement your work, or even just recommended reading lists and blogs from fellow BAs. There’s a lot of learning that can happen after you get BABOK certified. Business Analyst Learnings has a useful list of free courses for business analysts.

Read the whole post on Justinmind’s blog