On the morning of April 26, the world awoke to an unlikely sight — peace talks between North and South Korea. Not only were these talks the first meaningful talks between the two countries on that peninsula with a difficult past, but it was also the first time a North Korean leader had entered the south since the (sort of) end of the Korean War in 1953.

It’s now widely accepted that the progress made at the Winter Olympics, in Seoul, no less, that led to this massive leap forward for peace between the two Koreas. For the first time…


The British constitution, despite being uncodified, is among the most complex (and oldest) in the world. So, unsurprisingly, an ever-growing part of the population seem to be in favour of reforming it in some way: be it in order to give the vote to 16 year olds, to ditch First Past The Post, to abolish the Lords, or anything in between. However, there is one piece of recent constitutional reform that you’d be hard-pressed to find any constitutional expert who doesn’t consider it to be an appalling piece of legislation. …


Did you ever hear the tragedy of Amber Rudd? I thought not, it’s not a story the Conservatives would tell you. It may not be a tragedy of the Star Wars sort, but it’s hard to view the death of Amber Rudd’s political career as anything other than somewhat tragic.

Rudd was born into a very upper-middle class family in Marylebone, the daughter of a stockbroker and a magistrate. Her upbringing was fairly typical for those of such circumstances: she attended independent schools, followed by a history degree from Edinburgh university. …


In 1993 the then Prime Minister, John Major, was caught on hot mic saying that three of the members of his cabinet were ‘bastards’ — he was talking about the hard-right Eurosceptics. Even to this day, nobody knows who the three are exactly, though we have known for a very long time the four possible bastards: Michael Portillo, the Chief Secretary to the Treasury; Peter Lilley, the Secretary of State for Social Security (the predecessor department to Work and Pensions); Michael Howard, the Home Secretary, and the man who would later go on to be Tory leader between 2003 and…


The idea of a universal basic income for every man and woman has been gaining traction in recent years, and has the support of many from both the left and the right — libertarian economist Milton Friedman was a notable supporter of a variant of a universal basic income, called NIT, or Negative Income Tax.
For the uninitiated, a universal basic income is a sum of money paid unconditionally to every adult citizen of a country by the government.

There have been quite a few attempts at introducing UBI over the years, particularly in the 1960s and 1970s — Richard…

Jake Field-Gibson

Liberal Tory, Editor at Poltika.org.uk

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