Social Media Makes Us Unhappy. Here’s How We Turn That Upside Down.

For the sake of our collective sanity, let’s get together in-person again.

Science found that extended periods of social media use (particularly Facebook) actually makes us less happy.

Social media, the thing originally intended to connect us with anyone anywhere, makes us feel more alone than ever.

A dating app that uses your location and lets you swipe on people’s faces is absolutely wrecking men and women’s self-worth. It’s too vain and people take the digital rejection to heart.

My cousin deleted his Facebook because it was making him feel like his life was boring in comparison and he wasn’t measuring up to everyone else. He’s clearly not alone in those feelings.

Facebook and Instagram are highlight reels. They are like ESPN SportsCenter’s Top 10 of all the sporting events of the week but for your friends’ lives.

It’s not fair to compare the minute you’re sitting on the toilet in your dingy apartment to your friend’s highlight of their vacation. Just don’t compare yourself to others — they probably have different goals than you anyway.

To add insult to injury, only about half of the people you call a “friend” consider you the same.

So maybe after all this you don’t want to get together with your FB “friends”. Maybe you’d like to make a new connection. Or five. Find a new close friend.

With AirFive, you can do that. Connect with someone who is associated with the same group or school as you and get coffee. If you like each other, keep hanging out.

If you want to make new friends, AirFive is for you. You could find a new partner in love, adventure or both. Or you could use it to reconnect with those weak ties to strengthen the bonds, find a job or rekindle that flame.

The point is to connect. And get together in-person. More face-to-face interactions are what we desperately need.

“Communicating makes people happy.” — Gary Vaynerchuck (@GaryVee)

Humans speak more through body language than our words anyway. You don’t get body language on Facebook. Or even the tone of voice.

Connect with someone by making eye contact and smiling (the key to happiness and better relationships) over a cup of coffee at a local coffee shop.

We need each other. And purely digital connections aren’t building the kinds of relationship bonds we need.

Our brains are wired to connect with the people around us. Physically. Our brains aren’t wired into The Matrix. That’s why we need to be face-to-face for deep, meaningful connections.

It’s time we got back to our roots — spending quality time with the people we care about most, which should be those who care about us in return.

Disclosure: I work for AirFive, so I have a vested interest in that company.