How To Throw A Healthy Dinner Not Based On Food

Anytime I think, I make sure that my thoughts are delicious, inspiring, fun to think and not the least healthy!

I love Greek style, actually anything Mediterranean. Their thoughts are fresh and structured compared to some of the today’s more modern ones. French thoughts are wonderfully engaging and make up for a great gathering! If it’s Sunday, and I have a hangover or in a really good mood I want something American. If I’m melancholy I have cravings for German style thoughts, preferably steamed, to loosen up for any muscle tensions.

Here are a few tips to make sure your thoughts are healthy and delicious:

You don’t have to think locally
Your thoughts will feel better, and have an added benefit and are therefore healthier because the eye-opening inspiration will have crossed borders and been tested and thought through by many before you. Also, world-changing thoughts easier get popular globally. You’re in for a treat!

Think in terms of courses
The way, people live their lives nibbling at light and insufficient thoughts presented in media, quotes on Goodreads, rather than stuffing themselves with an extra book before bedtime or in the Sunday sun is still a mystery to me. I always start out with some kind of appetizer on my bookshelf for my guests and me to gaze at, like Dr. Seuss’ The Lorax. Who says food for thought should be boring? I like to put it on my shelf so it looks real pretty, and discretely let Simone de Beauvoir’s The Second Sex peep out behind it. You could even present the books on a platter with seasonal raw drafts from your favorite thinker — if you can get to her or his unpublished works!

I love serving books family-style so we can read to each other. It is so healthy and so easy to do in a crowd. And fun!

Then I’ll make a couple of suggestions, perhaps throw in a really radical thought on the table, and wait for everyone to just gasp and dig into the conversation. If I have time, I prepare the thoughts in advance. Try to prepare some side-thoughts as well, in case your guests don’t find the main thought appetizing.

I do have a sweet heart, so I almost always offer a homemade reconciliation. Just in case. There are definitely ways to keep the reconciliation light, especially in the summer, when you serve it accompanied by the sun and the beautiful aromas from the garden. A simple and healthy choice!

Let’s say I’ve got a French, an Asian, a French-free, not to mention an American-free thinker who are coming to my party. How do I make no one feel left out?
I feel that working with thinking-needs is more and more common these days. For a gathering of different world-views, if I had this particular combo of thinkers coming over, I’d grill their thoughts and roast their arguments along with several less provoking thought just to have the party nicely balanced. Since there is only one American-free thinker, I wouldn’t feel bad about serving American ideas to everyone else. But most importantly, it is still healthy and inspiring!

What’s important about sharing thoughts in a community?
I really don’t think we were ever intended to think alone. Thoughts and arguments have always been prepared and aired in a context of family and community. Thoughts, like fairy tales, are meant to be shared. Some of my happiest memories have taken place around the table over some homemade arguments; laughing, crying, and sharing with the people you love. Or hate.

There are also many well-documented health and psychological benefits of active thinking in your community. It reduces complexity, helps fight war and illiteracy, and develops as general sense of cleverness that can reduce your risk of making bad decisions and short-term investments. In kids, it helps them do better in school, grow up to be more successful, even though sometimes lonely if the other kids do not share the same food for thoughts.

All these benefits come from just thinking together!

#Foodie4Eva #Foodforthought #realsmart #hungry

Twitter: @KajsaPaludan

Books by @AnthonyHoward
@IsaksenTidd
@DanielKahneman

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Originally published at www.kajsapaludan.com on October 27, 2015.

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