Historic legislation makes Portland a leader in a nationwide trend to regulate facial recognition technology.

Amid sometimes violent protests and counter-protests around racial justice, today Portland, Oregon legislators unanimously passed groundbreaking new legislation to ban the use of facial recognition technology, which some see as a victory for civil rights and digital justice. …


The ban does not apply to Portland’s public schools, however

After eight months of speculation, details are finally emerging about Portland, Oregon’s groundbreaking legislation that would ban facial recognition in privately owned businesses and spaces accessible to the public.

The law would prohibit the use of facial recognition technologies at stores, banks, Airbnb rentals, restaurants, entertainment venues, public transit stations…


‘They’re hoping that they can stop it, and they can’t’

Late last year, Amazon spent $12,000 lobbying against a new facial recognition law in Portland, Oregon. The proposed legislation would outright ban the use of the technology by government and private entities, and threaten a range of businesses that sell and use the technology in the city. …


So, the other day a media student at UC Davis contacted me on LinkedIn, asking for advice on how she might cultivate a media career that supports her values and ideals. Evidently, she sees me as someone who has done that. …


Ever since I was around ten or eleven years old, sitting cross-legged on the basement floor of my childhood home on Wendover Ave. in Buffalo, New York pecking out “articles” on mom’s old typewriter for a makeshift “music magazine,” I’ve been a fan of creating media for fun, or idea…


There are important and undeniable distinctions between “subliminal” messages and blatant in-your-face announcements. Perhaps we don’t all need reminders of this fact, but apparently even Washington Post op-ed writers are unclear about them. Statements on t-shirts or apparel are not “subliminal,” nor are they “coded allusion[s].” …


Yep, just like the kids of Degrassi, what we need are tools for engaging intelligently with media, deciphering its origins and processing it.

(NOTE: After writing this piece, it was brought to my attention by Neil Anderson, president of the Association for Media Literacy and Media Studies Instructor for the…


Written in 2016, this mini-essay explains why the term “badass” is merely code for “female who doesn’t suck.”

This afternoon I saw one woman mending a fence and another walking out of a hardware store with supplies and all I could think was, “Some asshole out there would call them…


I was among the first reporters to cover the use of data and digital media by political campaigns since as far back as 2002. In 2009 I exposed how voter information was collected by the Republican and Democratic Parties and merged with databases run by AOL, Yahoo, and Microsoft to…


Kelly Halliburton pulled into Tombstone in his truck that afternoon in 2007 and spotted Fred Cole out trimming the grass with a weed whacker. …

Kate Kaye

Kate Kaye is an enterprise and investigative journalist who reports with words and audio. She lives in Portland, OR. Find her on Twitter at @KateKayeReports.

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