This post originally appeared on CirculationExchange.org. It is part of a series of essays by Kate Palmer Albers about artists working with images in the contemporary era.

In 2015, I wrote a year-end list of ten things I liked in photography — my only rule was that none of the items be photobooks or exhibitions, both categories that are clearly — even exceptionally — well-covered elsewhere. As I wrote then: another way for photography to come into your hands or into your view — to find you where you are and offer a unique viewing experience — is to arrive on a nearby screen, like the ones in your pockets and on your desks. These closely held, frequently-accessed, and highly personal viewing spaces are often overlooked as viable creative — and, I would now add — scholarly realms. …


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Amanda Ross-Ho, The Character and Shape of Illuminated Things (Facial Recognition), City Hall Park, New York, 2015. Courtesy the artist.

Amanda Ross-Ho’s artwork ‘The Character and Shape of Illuminated Things’ harnesses the contemporary urge to record and disseminate images

This post originally appeared on CirculationExchange.org. It is part of a series of articles on artists and projects working with photographic images in the contemporary era.

One of the things I enjoy about living in Los Angeles is the ample opportunity for observing art that at times appears to exist largely for the purpose of generating photographs to post on social media. …


This post originally appeared on CirculationExchange.org. It is part of a series of essays by Kate Palmer Albers about artists working with images in the contemporary era.

There are really a lot of year-end top-ten photobook lists. One reason for the relatively recent surge in popularity of photobooks and their attendant year-end lists is certainly their accessibility: they bring photography into the hands of viewers, with fewer geographic and temporal constraints than an exhibition. But another way for photography to come into your hands — to find you where you are and offer a unique viewing experience — is to arrive on a nearby screen, like the ones in your pockets and on your desks. These closely held, frequently-accessed, and arguably highly personal viewing spaces are often overlooked as viable creative realms. …


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‘Cascine Risaia e Barraccone, Piedmont, Italy’ from the series “No Man’s Land” by Mishka Henner.

This post originally appeared on CirculationExchange.org. It is part of a series of articles on artists and projects working with photographic images in the contemporary era.

Recently, I Googled a friend’s name, and the first search result was the public record of her salary. This was not information I wanted to know: I felt awkward, and like I had crossed a line in our relationship by asking an inappropriate question — no matter how inadvertently it had happened. …


(Or, Everything I Know about Alec Soth I Learned on Snapchat)

This post originally appeared on CirculationExchange.org. It is part of a series of essays by Kate Palmer Albers about artists working with images in the contemporary era.

There is no shortage of short biographies of Alec Soth. Most of them follow standard art world protocol for any artist biography: brief personal background; significant bodies of work; notable exhibitions and publications; awards, fellowships, and accolades; and institutions that have collected the artist’s work. Some bios seek to provide an overarching thematic arch, others aim to humanize with a short anecdote. …


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Sketch, sent via text, of the Large Format Selfie Stick (LFSS).

21st-century self-expression, hacked by 19th-century apparatus

This post originally appeared on CirculationExchange.org. It is the second in a series of articles by Kate Palmer Albers about artists working with images in the contemporary era.

I was introduced to the Large Format Selfie Stick (LFSS) via Snapchat which, in hindsight, seems just perfect.

I almost never screenshot Snapchats. Screenshots may be the easiest way to save a Snapchat, but I mostly think of a screenshot as cheating myself out of a properly ephemeral experience. But I did screenshot the LFFS because, like everyone else, I like to think I know genius when I see it:


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Penelope Umbrico, images from “A Proposal and Two Trades” 2013-present. Courtesy the artist.

How one artist is making sense of filters, authorship, exchange, and digital ideas about analog photography

This post originally appeared on CirculationExchange.org. It is the first in a series of articles on artists and projects working with images in the contemporary era.

Earlier this year, the New York-based artist Penelope Umbrico started an Instagram feed devoted to her project, “A Proposal and Two Trades,” which was initially conceived two years ago for the 2013 Alt+ 1000 Festival de Photographie, a biennial event in the Swiss Alps village of Rossinière.

Umbrico’s choice of Instagram (@penelopeumbrico_altplus1000) for the continuous stream of images struck me as a natural home for her ongoing project: a perfect example of an artist taking seriously both the possibilities and parameters of a currently popular platform, and, in a particularly mobile manner, extending the project’s commitment to moving images through material and immaterial spaces, touching a range of strangers and audiences along the way. …

About

Kate Palmer Albers

Online: CirculationExchange.org. In print: Uncertain Histories: Accumulation, Inaccessibility and Doubt in Contemporary Photography

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