Sexism in Tech: Don’t Ask Me Unless You’re Ready To Call Somebody a Whistleblower

  1. Make sure the systems to handle malicious abuses of power against women have teeth, and that they seek to let the disenfranchised blow the whistle, rather than simply “keeping stuff under control.”
  2. Help your well-intentioned peers who are still making mistakes do better without threatening them or humiliating them.
  3. Make a public commitment to taking potential whistleblowers seriously. Commit to educating yourself, to having an opinion, and, if you believe the whistleblower’s claims might have merit, to helping. Live up to that commitment.

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I like looking at things from a systemic perspective. On good days I fix things. Most days I also like people. I make stuff.

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Katy Levinson

Katy Levinson

I like looking at things from a systemic perspective. On good days I fix things. Most days I also like people. I make stuff.