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As a leader, it is uncommon that you will ever have a clear schedule. When you took on your role as a founder, CEO, or president, you sidelined a more flexible schedule in exchange for the responsibility of making your vision a reality. Yet, while you will rarely not have a busier schedule, that does not mean you should be a “busy” leader.

You might be wondering how it is possible not to be a busy leader, since you always have a phone call you need to take, a meeting you need to lead, or a strategy session you need to dedicate time to in order to get closer to reaching this year’s goals. …


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In the business world, ‘good’ just isn’t good enough anymore. The landscape is too competitive for your success to hinge on mediocracy. A good business can make you money, but it won’t establish you as a leader in your industry. A good employee can keep the ship afloat, but you can’t expect them to spark innovation within your organisation. A good leader can lead, but they lack the ability to influence greatness in themselves, their employees, and their industries.

Don’t settle for being a good leader: strive to be great. You can read as many books and articles as you can find, attend as many leadership development programs that money can buy, and you can seek advice and guidance through one (or more) mentors, but great leadership, first and foremost, comes from within. To understand if you approach leading from the right frame of mind, ask yourself these four…


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Larger organisations have the resources to pay their employees higher salaries. They also have the ability to extend better insurance policies to their employees, as well as offer other big-business perks like retirement plans, more paid vacation time, and consistent opportunities for advancement. Yet, despite all of these benefits that employees care about , smaller companies beat out big business when it comes to employee engagement.

Studies show that firms with fewer employees — less than 25 workers, to be exact — have teams that are 41 percent more engaged than businesses with more employees. …

About

Kealan Delaney

Kealan Delaney is the CEO of Delmec Engineering, headquartered in Carlow, Ireland. Kealan is a graduate of the University of Limerick and Harvard OPM42.