I don’t see a “solution” that disincentivizes people from going to medical school as a long term…
David Cearley
1

It depends what they do instead, doesn’t it? We don’t have a shortage of people who want to be doctors, but in the long run, adding another doctor doesn’t add much in the way of positive health outcome delivery. The goal is (or should be) improving health. So if the bright young person interested in medicine decides instead to invent a way to deliver more good health care than she could have delivered by becoming a doctor, that’s a net benefit to society. Technological paths to delivering health care offer scale advantages that 1-by-1 admissions to med school don’t. That trend is going to continue to accelerate, while the education of doctors is going to continue to be as slow and arduous as ever. Indeed, physicians and medical community lobbies work hard at keeping the education of medical professionals slow and arduous, since that helps ensure the scarcity that keeps their salaries high. Have you seen them lobbying to dramatically increase medical school enrollment and to reduce licensing requirements for Physicians Assistants and high-end nurses? I haven’t…

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