Vocational scholarships help kids get jobs — and strengthen the economy

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Micheal Bartley is attending Johnson & Wales University in Rhode Island on a vocational scholarship. Photo credit: Tom Proch, taken for the college and used with permission.

Want to know why it can be tougher to get an appointment with your electrician or your plumber than with your doctor? The answer is simple: Our national and state policies funnel most high school graduates into colleges and universities. Even young people who show an interest in vocational training are urged to study computer technology.

“College for all” is not working. Forty percent of those who enroll in college drop out, according to College Dropout Rates. And not enough young people are mastering important trade skills. While technology matters, society also needs welders, electricians, plumbers, landscapers, woodworkers, nurses and other health care workers, auto mechanics, and chefs. …


WHY EVERYONE SHOULD NOT GO TO COLLEGE

Vocational scholarships help kids get jobs — and strengthen our economy

by Ed Hajim and Kenneth Roman

Want to know why it can be tougher to get an appointment with your electrician or your plumber than with your doctor? The answer is simple: Our national and state policies funnel most high school graduates into colleges and universities. Even young people who show an interest in vocational training are urged to study computer technology.

“College for all” is not working. Forty percent of those who enroll in college drop out. And not enough young people are mastering important trade skills. While technology matters, society also needs welders, electricians, plumbers, landscapers, woodworkers, nurses and other health care workers, auto mechanics, and chefs. …


Remembering Alan Reich, who helped write the Americans With Disability Act, on its 30th anniversary

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Alan Reich was the first person to address the United Nations from a wheelchair, in 1981. Photo Credit: National Organization on Disability. Used with permission.

On the 30th anniversary of the Americans With Disability Act, let’s remember the man who helped write it. Alan Reich also put the statue of FDR in a wheelchair at his memorial in Washington, DC, founded The National Organization on Disability, and helped make the world better for 52 million Americans with disability.

His Dartmouth College classmates remember Reich always running. He ran to his classes. He ran to football practice (first team All New England). He ran to track events (All American in the javelin) and captained the rugby team. And he ran the senior class as its president.

After four years with the U.S. Army, he went to work for Polaroid, working with a great company at its peak. His marriage to his wife Gay was a perfect match, and they had four young children. …


The former CEO of Ogilvy & Mather reflects his experiences with some of his firm’s most iconic leaders

David Ogilvy, founder and president of the advertising agency Ogilvy & Mather.
David Ogilvy, founder and president of the advertising agency Ogilvy & Mather.
Photo: Bettmann/Getty Images

David Ogilvy, the father of modern advertising, once said: “Great hospitals do two things: They look after patients, and they teach young doctors. Ogilvy & Mather does two things: We look after clients, and we teach young people. Ogilvy & Mather is the teaching hospital of the advertising world.”

I was blessed in the advertising business with a succession of great bosses. …


A look back at the marketing pioneers who brought us Baskin-Robbins and Barbie — and lured the Brooklyn Dodgers to Los Angeles

The ubiquitous yellow “smiley face” — the first emoji, as it was dubbed later, and perhaps the widely used visual icon ever drawn — was created by Harvey Ball, a graphic artist in Worcester, Massachusetts, in 1963.

But he wasn’t the first with the idea. Two years earlier, a couple of charming guys in Los Angeles had come up with an inventively different smiley to brand their start-up advertising agency. They topped it with a phrase that became embedded in our conversation. Art director Jack Roberts doodled a figure drawing his own smiling face. His business partner, Ralph Carson, added a line from how he sent his kids off to school each day. “You can have a bad day or a happy day. …


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Make the most of your time spent emailing. Photo by Bench Accounting on Unsplash

Ten principles to improve your email game, communicate effectively, and get things done

This segment from the comic strip Dilbert says it … with a smile.

ASOK: “Did you read my email?”

DILBERT: “No. It was too long.”

ASOK: “Maybe you could read it when you have more time.”

DILBERT: “I never have time to read email messages that are too long. Maybe you could rewrite it to be shorter.”

ASOK: “I don’t have time to rewrite it.”

DILBERT: “And I don’t have the time to read it.”

It’s not a joke. Sloppy emails waste time, don’t get results, and reflect poorly on the writer.

Without email, organizations would grind to a halt. But it has to be managed. What does it take to get a busy executive to open your email — and do something? …


Ad exec Bill Phillips made New York City’s nickname immortal

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The Big Apple poster was created by Ogilvy & Mather and given as a present to New York City. (Courtesy of Ogilvy & Mather)

Bill Phillips was walking to work from his Manhattan apartment, eating an apple, one spring morning in 1975. As the chairman of ad agency Ogilvy & Mather stepped over piles of refuse, he thought: “I must be crazy to live here.” A garbage strike was only one of many problems facing New York: Crime was up, bankruptcy was looming, and there was no prospect of a bailout.

Phillips, who died in December, had volunteered his agency to boost the city’s reputation, but hadn’t found the right angle. When he got to the agency that morning, he told creative director Jay Schulberg his insight from that walk: that New Yorkers have a love-hate relationship with their city. …


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An image of young Steve Jobs with Steve Wozniak at a 2010 Apple presentation. Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

It’s easy in retrospect to say you would grab the leader who drove the creation of the iPhone, iPad and so many other things that built Apple into the most valuable company in the world.

But would you have taken on this scruffy college drop-out who showed some interest in technology but looked like a hippie and smelled so bad that Atari had to assign him to the night shift to placate co-workers who complained he seldom showered or used a deodorant? The negatives went beyond a lack of obvious qualifications, body odor and dress. …

About

Kenneth Roman

Kenneth Roman is co-author of “Writing That Works”

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