This is not a guide: Is the Alt-Right white supremacist?

Yes.

Steve Bannon is a major figure in the Alt-Right, and the Alt-Right is, among other things, a white supremacist school of thought.

The Alt-Right does not claim this term, but they describe what most people consider the important parts of white supremacist ideology. They believe America belongs to white people —they just don’t want any further quarrel with the “sub-species” that will have to be deported.

When President-elect Donald Trump announced that Bannon would be his chief strategist he drew the rebuke of everyone who rejects him entirely already, and that of anti-Semitism watchdog the Anti-Defamation League. Other advocacy organizations for American Jews as well as Israel lobby AIPAC have given him a pass.

In the flood of posts that piggy-backed on the ADL’s attack of Trump, not a single quote or act by Bannon, other than his association with the Alt-Right, was given for painting him as a bigot.

The conversation on the matter was quickly reduced to two firmly decided camps, insisting either that racism is just a buzzword to shut-down arguments or that Bannon is a Nazi and this is all we need to know.

Breitbart.com published an article defending Bannon, praising him as a hero of Israel, then backed this with analysis from Alan Dershowitz, a Harvard law professor, who said it was “not legitimate to call Bannon anti-Semitic.”

“I think the larger problem — and it’s a very complicated one today — is how you assess a person who himself might not have negative characteristics, but who has widespread appeal to people who do,”

Dershowitz is not totally incorrect. There are reasons Steve Bannon and Donald Trump appeal to racists, and we should look to those.

Bannon himself has denied holding “ethno-nationalist” views.

“It’s not that some people on the margins, as in any movement, aren’t bad guys — racists, anti-Semites,” but that minority is irrelevant, said Bannon.

We can let the Alt-Right speak for itself.

Jared Taylor, head of American Renaissance and hold-out for a comeback of the colonialism joke, explains in a primer video that the Alt-Right is “United in rejecting the dogma that all races are equal.”

“There is no reason to think that non-whites can maintain Western Civilization, the civilization that whites created,” says Taylor.

Taylor’s video “Why Blacks Riot” might have had more scientific information.

In August 2016, Vox Day, author of SJWs Always Lie, posted 16 items as a proposed core philosophy for the Alt-Right. Three in particular apply:

5. The Alt Right is openly and avowedly nationalist. It supports all nationalisms and the right of all nations to exist, homogeneous and unadulterated by foreign invasion and immigration.
14. The Alt Right believes we must secure the existence of white people and a future for white children.
15. The Alt Right does not believe in the general supremacy of any race, nation, people, or sub-species. Every race, nation, people, and human sub-species has its own unique strengths and weaknesses, and possesses the sovereign right to dwell unmolested in the native culture it prefers.

The key-word there is “sub-species.”

Also worth note is that number 14 bears striking similarity to the “14 Words,” the White Supremacist slogan: “We must secure the existence of our people and a future for white children.”

The position is supported by Alt-Righters with work by the likes of debunked 19th Century social Darwinist Herbert Spencer.

There is no way to know how many members of the movement hold this explicit belief — but the appeal of Donald Trump’s plan for immigrants and his regard of Muslims seem obvious.

Bannon said in a 2014 radio interview that he felt affording due process to people detained by US Immigration and Customs Enforcement amounted to “amnesty…that somehow everybody there should get a hearing…they should be processed and deported immediately.”

The claim that white supremacy is just a quirk of the Alt-Right’s fringe is plainly disingenuous. If Bannon is not a white supremacist himself, then he is the one on the margins of a movement, one for which he has been a driving financial and intellectual force.

Vox Day’s 12th principle is “The Alt Right doesn’t care what you think of it.” This one is probably more useful to those already attempting to crucify Bannon for association with it.

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