WVSE Meetup, Intro to NoSQL

I had the opportunity to speak recently at the monthly Willamette Valley Software Engineers (WVSE) Meetup (@WVSEmeetup) about NoSQL. I would like to thank the organizers of the event, Angelo Seminary (@angeloseminary of i.t.motives) and Brenton Paulson (@brentonpaulsen) for a great event. Mr. Paulson’s company, MAPS Credit Union offers a great venue. This was my second time attending an event at WVSE, the first as a speaker. Both visits have been great experiences, and very well coordinated.

Willamette Valley Software Engineers (WVSE)

Discussion Topic

I did a high level overview of NoSQL and what some of the different models of databases look like in the NoSQL world. We then took a look at how MongoDB fits into the NoSQL space. I have a blog post about Why NoSQL to, take a look here.

In addition to the overview I provided a brief example of CRUD operations in MongoDB. While the coverage of CRUD wasn’t too in depth, it was a good introduction. I have posts on CRUD with MongoDB using Python and Java for additional reading.

As NoSQL seemed to be a relatively new topic to most of the dozen or so people in attendance, there were some great questions asked. Hopefully I was able satisfactorily answer everyone’s questions. It was great to have Chase Swanson in attendance too as he was able to add his experience with MongoDB to the discussion.

About WVSE

If you are a software engineer or developer in the greater Willamette Valley area, I would encourage you to check WVSE out. They meet regularly to share ideas, learn from one another, to network and meet others, and to have a good time! Regardless of your preferred technology or favorite languages or tools they would like you to join them. Their format is to meet once a month with some casual networking, a presentation with Q and A, and maybe some after hours at a fun place to cap the evening. You can check out their upcoming meetings and topics on their Meetup page.

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