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On Tuesday, October, 19th, 2010, my father Georges Anglade passed away at the age of 59 as a result of cirrhosis of the liver. At the time, I remember being devastated. I couldn’t believe that the man who had pretty much been my guide and protector was gone. You see, my father was a superhero to me. To me, the ranking of men in my life at the time was God, Jesus and then him. I couldn’t think of a dilemma I had prior to his passing that he wouldn’t help me get through. I watched him get up at 4AM everyday to go to work and provide for his family. So when he passed, naturally there was a void. But looking back at the last ten years, his work and legacy hasn’t been in vain. …


By spring of 2019, I had been in the latter portion of my second year as a Teach For America corps member. Not only was I on the verge of completing my terms of service but I was exhausted. I was drained physically, mentally and emotionally from having to deal with the uphill battle that came with working inside of an impoverished school within a poor district. After showing frustration and venting about how I felt to my girlfriend, (who is also a teacher) she provided me with a viable option after hearing me talk about it day in and day out. “Start looking for jobs in another district.” As soon as she said it, a light-bulb instantly went off in my dome. Of course, Kev. Look for a job elsewhere.


Top Ten Rap/R&B Album of 2010s

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Growing up I’ve always loved hip-hop. There’s always been something about the art form that has done wonders for my mind as well as my spirit as a Black man in the United States. Although my parents are immigrants from Haiti, that has not stopped me from identifying with the art form that originated in South Bronx in 1973. During my time spent in grade school, I would hear Rap and R&B blasting all throughout the car stereos of my neighborhood, whether it was Eminem, Ja Rule, Jay-Z, Nas, DMX, Usher and Aaliyah. I’ll never forget my first owned rap album that my older sister bought for me which was Beware of Dog by Bow Wow. That was the first time I ever knew a rap song by heart. The next time hip-hop would change me for the better was in 2007 when Lupe Fiasco released his sophomore LP, Lupe Fiasco’s The Cool. The kind of rhyming prowess Lupe displayed on that record was phenomenal as he told stories that were stark, funny and cinematic. After that album I was sold on storytelling, and rap as an art form. I no longer viewed music as something that was easy and fun for a moment but as statements that could last a lifetime. I cared about records and what they represented. Therefore, it was only natural that in the decade of 2010, I craved excellent songwriting, great lyrics, sound production, overarching themes. Simply put: a body of work. The albums I have listed below are records that stood out to me over the last ten years as I matured into adulthood and became a man. These albums all have a special place in my heart and will forever be remembered for teaching me something and making me feel certain ways that I will probably never experience again as I will soon enter my thirties. …


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Dear Kevin,

I’m your future self, ten years from now. First and foremost, congratulations!!! The beginning to the rest of your life begins now. How are you feeling? You’re probably going through a constant flux of emotions currently. I know you feel a lot of angst about college but you’ve been raised right by your parents. You are going to get through it!!! The reason why I’m writing to you right now is because I’ve been through some of the things you will have to endure in due time and I figured I’d write to tell you what to expect on the journey up ahead. The first thing you need to realize is that college is a good idea for anyone wanting to get ahead in life but the schooling you’ll receive alone is not the answer. …


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New School, New Rules

In 2018–19, I became the English Language Arts Teacher at West Middle Community School. As I transferred there fresh off my first-year teaching experience at Simpson-Waverly, I was hoping for similar results. However, I quickly learned that a new environment is one that brings forth a lot of adjustment. Whether that be daily routine, getting used to the people around you and how one goes about executing the job at hand. I remember feeling hopeful prior to the first day of school but also a bit vulnerable at the same time. There was no doubt that I wished I could drive up to the north end of Hartford and continue teaching at the gem of a school I loved but that wasn’t reality. I had to set my focus upon the present. …


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In 2017–18, I found myself to be extremely fortunate to have been hired as a 7 th/8 thgrade ELA teacher at Simpson-Waverly Community School in Hartford, Connecticut. After completing my training at TFA Institute in Philly where I served my summer 17' assignment at Simon Gratz High School, I was ready for the next chapter. Or, at least I thought I was. After returning home on Sunday, July 30 th. I racked my brain wondering what was next for me in Connecticut as I hadn’t been offered a job or granted many interviews at that point in time. …


In the ten years that have passed since my sister, Alexandra Anglade’s death I’ve watched my mother, Jocelyne Marie Joseph undergo a series of metamorphosis in which she went from being depressed and livid with the world to now being at piece through all of the things she’s been through.

Ten years later and I no longer live at home with her but I do know that where she was mentally and emotionally during the holidays in 2007 is not the same woman she is now. During that time frame I remember seeing my mother look worn and defeated. Without question it was definitely the lowest that she had ever been in her life. Both as a mother and a woman, I’m sure. At that time, I felt hopeless watching her suffer and endear the pain she was forced to live with. …


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This year marks the 10th anniversary of my late sister, Alexandra Anglade’s passing. And although so much time has elapsed since then, I still find it hard to believe that she’s no longer living on this earth. What is more is that I find it hard to believe that ten years have flown by in a blink of an eye. At the time of her sudden demise, I was a sixteen-year-old kid living within the means of my existence. By that, I mean doing teenage stuff such as playing basketball, talking/singing to girls (by trying to emulate Chris Brown & Mario) figuring out high school and trying to regulate a bad acne problem I had at the time. …


I wrote this post on my father’s birthday (10/10). Instead of thinking heavily about his unfortunate demise seven years ago (which coincidentally falls in a month in which he also perished) I’ve somehow come to think about it as a revival of sorts that cements the beautiful memories I have of him. There aren’t many people that I’ve spoken with or reached out to that know the facts of what time period in between my father’s fate was like.

Therefore, one year later I’d like to share with you all a section from my first and a half edition of Life Comes From Concrete that details what really happened seven years ago as I witnessed my dad waste away. …

About

Kevin Anglade

Kevin Anglade is a writer, poet, scholar, educator and publisher from Queens, NY. 1/2 of The Wise Guys Pod www.kevinanglade.com

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