Photo Credit: Trey Singleton

Why We Don’t Discount

Kevin Lavelle
Oct 15, 2014 · 5 min read

America has a discount addiction to cheap junk we don’t need.

I refuse to play that game.

“Hey — can I get a discount?”

The real reason people want a discount: because nearly every single company offers them. All. The. Time.

Why do companies consistently discount? The simple answer is because it works. Sort of.

Most companies will use discounts to get things “moving” when they start off and there certainly are no shortage of websites that produce nothing except compiling a list of companies and their discounted products. Once a company starts discounting or listing on those sites though, it becomes virtually impossible to not discount further because consumer and company alike become addicted to the boost (revenue for the company, savings for the consumer). The long term damage to the brand is almost instant. The need to further manipulate their consumers is never ending and almost always needs to grow. How many 70% off signs have you seen? They probably started with 10% off for a first time buyer, then graduated to 25% for an email address before jumping to 50% off because it’s a hot Tuesday in February. That’s a short road to an absurd 70% off. Clearly, a valuable product.

Most of the stuff people buy on those steep discounts is poorly made imports that will fall apart within a season anyway. Our addiction to cheap crap has myriad costs: from the human side of unscrupulous foreign manufacturing to the volume of waste we produce as a society throwing away junk… but hey — it was 25% off!

There are indeed companies who live an addict-free lifestyle. They are few and far between, and there’s something really interesting about how people perceive those companies and their products: people view them as inherently better, more respectable, and to be frank “worth it” to spend their money there.

Apple. lululemon. CrossFit boxes (most of them). People understand it’s a high value, high quality product or service that is worth their hard earned dollars. The proof couldn’t be more clear:

Have you ever heard of a sale on an Apple product?

Think about restaurants who use Groupon and that favorite place of yours at which you can never get a table. Your favorite place may only go so far as a $2 off specials during happy hour Monday through Wednesday, right? The same standard and theory holds true for services and software companies.

When it comes to Mizzen+Main, I drew a line in the sand early. Believe me, it was hard to turn down the opportunity for a quick boost in sales when I was trying to build the brand from the ground up. Very hard. Those flash sale sites? Company XYZ sold 1,000 units! Think of what we could do! One thing is certain: we’d never recover and our customers would know our product wasn’t worth what we were charging.

At $125 for a dress shirt, our product is neither cheap nor in the truly expensive range of dress shirts from $190-$400. (Yes, there are dress shirts that cost $400.) We offer a high quality, proudly American made product that is unlike anything ever seen before. We’re bringing advanced performance fabrics to traditional menswear, indistinguishable in appearance to some of the most well known dress shirt companies out there. Our customers don’t have to iron or dry clean their shirts anymore (nice little cost and time savings there too), and the feedback we hear again and again is “I’m going to replace my entire closet with Mizzen+Main. Why has no one done this before?”

So no, we don’t discount, because we believe in the quality of our product, our commitment to our supply chain, and delivering the best possible customer service experience we can.

Our customers appreciate knowing we’ve set a fair price, don’t play games, and deliver on our promises.

More and more, the response we are getting is an incredibly positive one towards not discounting. We’re a long way off from being that next great American brand and definitely aren’t in the leagues of Apple or lululemon, but we’ll stick to our principles and try to set the best example we can.

Photo Credit: Trey Singleton.

If you’ve enjoyed reading this and agree that the discount game has gotten out of hand, I’d sincerely appreciate you hitting recommend below! If you disagree, that’s ok, you can still hit recommend too!

Kevin Lavelle

Written by

Love @lady_lavelle. @MizzenAndMain CEO & Founder.