Okay, I get that.
Nathan Whiteside
13

However, while you are trying to get black people not to blame others for their problems, what winds up happening is that you’re also deflecting appropriate responsibility from white power structures, which are run by white people for the benefit of white people.

Can you give an example of a “power structure” that is run by white people for white people? Outside of something like the KKK (which is not all that powerful) I can’t think of any.

As just one example among countless many, during the housing bubble, Wells Fargo and other banks *deliberately* funneled many black families (not white families) into subprime loans even though they qualified for better, less expensive loans.

That is an incredibly broad and horrible allegation to levy without a lot of data to back it up. Let’s keep in mind that prior to the meltdown, the nonprimes (subprime is a specific kind of nonprime, btw) the nonprimes were NOT considered inferior loans; nor were they, generally speaking, more expensive than a conventional, other than the fact that PMI is required of all loans with an LTV of > 80%. Regardless of race, color, or creed, I might add.

There are about a million reasons why a mortgage broker might steer a nonqualifying (for what they wished to buy) buyer into a nonprime; and although none of these reasons are racial, they are often correlated to categories which have higher percentages of minorities in them. For example, lower income levels and lower FICO scores were more likely to be presented with a nonprime; it is not the fault of the broker that minorities are overrepresented in those two categories.

So, how have you parsed out this very complex data (which even the Fed viewed as impossible during the meltdown) to draw the conclusion that Wells conducted business in a racist manner?

That means that the mostly white-owned and -run banks essentially swindled black families out of their largest asset and best vehicle for upward economic mobility. And this isn’t an isolated incident.

Well, we’re waiting on the data before jumping to that conclusion.

This and worse were common practices in places like Chicago for most of the 20th century.

Well, now you’re talking about redlining, which was outlawed back in the 70’s and 80’s. That’s an entirely different issue. There’s no question that the economy consciously worked to disfavor minorities forty years ago; however, it’s highly debatable to make that claim over the last two decades.

So while you’re focusing on slavery as a phenomenon of the distant past, black people are experiencing economically devastating exploitation to this very day.

How is that? How are they being exploited? What is the methodology of that exploitation.

And when you deflect rightful responsibility from white power structures onto the victims of those power structures, you are making yourself *complicit* in the injustices they perpetrate. That’s why you are getting yourself lumped in with racists and apologists for racism. I suspect that that isn’t your intent, but that is the reality, and no one can change your choices and perspective but you, so that makes it your responsibility. Does that make sense?

No. It looks to me like you’ve taken as truth, without any critical thinking, these ideas that there are “power structures” that today act in a disenfranchising way. Unless you can prove that point, there is no complicity, and thus no racists, and thus no apologists for racism.

You’ve essentially come to a conclusion based on a house of cards which I highly doubt you can prove exists.

And btw, you might want to reconsider the next time you want to instruct Svetlana Voreskova on matters of history. She handed you your head.