Not really.
王可森
1

How would you have this implemented.

Fairly easily. It would be pathetically simple for the government to spoof a few transactions with a made-up identity to a vendor, then sit back and see if they got any marketing offers to that made-up identity.

You do realize the internet is not limited to only the United States, and that accessing servers outside of the states then places that data outside of the jurisdiction of US law right?

Obviously, in that I have been doing “internet”work since ARPAnet.

But legally speaking, a company which is domiciled in the US is never outside US jurisdiction. There’s a reason why gambling companies such as Sands never tried to get into internet gambling, despite the ability to host all the data in their Macau facility, is that simply moving the data doesn’t mean that a US company doesn’t have to comply with US law.

And even if you’re doing business completely outside the US, that doesn’t mean the US can’t hammer you, if you piss them off enough. The Cayman Islands used to be a financial services haven notorious for not sharing customer information with the IRS; well, after the meltdown, the US got annoyed with tax havens, and “induced compliance”.

So essentially your suggesting that a worldwide law be forced to anonymize the data of people using the internet?

No, that’s your misinterpretation of how the legalities surrounding the internet.

And that we should simply force governments to adopt this standard? Yeah good luck with that.

I’m not suggesting it, but if they wanted to, they could. It’s already been done with banking.

I get the sense that you think you know a lot more than you actually do.

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