This entire response was a pretty big pile of bullshit.
Craig Cook
1032

This entire response was a pretty big pile of bullshit. You’re great at making false equivalencies, but everything else is a dumpster fire.

Laughs. OK, let’s throw down. :-)

There is far more than “nebulous circumstantial evidence” to suggest Donald John Trump is a racist. From his father being in the Klan…

His father is not the subject here. Lots of pretty pathetic individuals have begotten children who did not hold their views on anything. Joseph P. Kennedy was one, being at least a Nazi appeaser (to be generous), and at worst a sympathizer. So, let’s move on.

in the early 1900’s to discrimination of his apartments in the 1970’s to his full page ad calling for the execution of innocent men in the 1980’s to saying he only trusted jews, and not African Americans, to count his money in the 1990’s to his current racist rants at everyone not the same as he — dude has shown his true colors for decades.

Since you’ve mentioned “early 1900's” here, all the way to 80’s and 90’s. I have no idea if you’re talking about Trump’s dad or Trump. If you have specific quotations IN CONTEXT, FROM THE CURRENT PRESIDENT, and RECENT (people do evolve, you know) that you find damning, I would love to see them, and if they are indeed damning, I will be glad to revise my views on the matter.

You apparently keep up with Mr. Trump’s utterances much more closely than I do. I find the man to be annoying at best.

And you know that; the underlying sentimentality in this country about the anthem and the flag are very strong, and anyone who disrespects those symbols quickly becomes a pariah.” Tell that to Tommie Smith and John Carlos, whose raised fists offended Americans at first, but have now become a welcome symbol of bravery to tell the power establishment to go pound sand.

You’re not understanding my post at all. Let me qualify.

I admire people who speak truth to power. What I don’t admire are people who embrace empty or counterproductive symbolism rather than positively addressing social inequity.

(I recall reading an article by some virtue-signaller crowing about how some post-election demonstration had (get this) shut down a busy intersection for three whole hours. That, to him, was some sort of “win”. Really?)

Social inequity still exists because, at this stage in our history, we are largely unable to address it through legislation or policy. IOW, the corrective policies and legislation is in place; what remains is to change the hearts of men. However, as you well know, you cannot pass a law that outlaws racist thoughts or beliefs; all you can do is outlaw public racist *behaviors*. We cannot legislate outcomes.

However, this type of protest does not advance any social inequity goals. Any goals that were top of mind with Kap have now been drowned out by the spectacle and the platform chosen.

Sorry that Shawn King and Colin Kaepernick have upset your world by fighting for justice. It must be tough to be such a delicate flower in such a harsh world.

I don’t think the world is harsh in the least, so spare me the snark. In fact, that’s large part of why this annoys me; because the world its NOT harsh, in the legal or policy sense, for anyone in the US. It’s impossible for any minority group today to point to a LAW which disadvantages them, while there are plenty of laws (and policies and regs) that actually ADVANTAGE them in “competition” (really not the right word, but nothing else comes to mind) in relation to the US majority.

Now, that statement does NOT mean that social inequity is a thing of the past; what it means is what social inequity exists is beyond the scope of public policy to address.

Which is why I’m PO’d; I lost my family Sunday for…..no good reason.

Hope that helps.

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