Actually I do believe the “machine” is as corrupt as they do…
gary
1

Let’s expand on that, since my original post was basically a set of one liners, sometimes on topics (like the notion of corruption) which are not well served by a casual treatment.

Actually I do believe the “machine” is as corrupt as they do…

We have to first agree on a definition of corruption, and a read of your post indicates we don’t completely agree.

The strong exerting influence over the weak is part of human nature. So, that’s not corruption. What’s corruption, to ME, is where a government which is supposed to be “by the people, for the people” fails to do so, BECAUSE those strong influences have successfully exerted power to control the GOVERNMENT, as opposed to controlling the PEOPLE.

Put another way, the strong aren’t corrupt; they’re just being their tawdry selves. Of course they’re going to try to influence the government. Soros, Koch, all behaviors which are perfectly expected.

The corruption starts when the politician allows their influence to alter their priorities from “by the people, for the people” because of that influence.

The really hard part is figuring out what’s influence and what’s education. If a big donor convinces a politician to support some policy that shouldn’t be supported because it’s not good for the broad population, that’s influence. However, if the same big donor convinces a politician to support some policy which benefits BOTH the donor AND the population……that’s education.

It’s a mess, actually. Very hard to police, govern, and extremely hard to analyze.

There MAY be a better one but we haven’t conceived it yet!

Well, that’s why economic libertarians such as myself are economic libertarians. We see the morass of reconciling powerful donor and influence and policy and benefit to populace as far too difficult for any governmental agency to do, EVEN IF that governmental agency were absolutely free of outside influence (which can never happen.)

So, let the economy run itself, and intervene only when it becomes blantantly clear that the OUTPUT from the policy is lopsided; then intervene to reconcile.

IOW, trust the market rather than the people in it.

But, that’s economics. Social policy is an entirely different matter, of course.

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