Take a closer look at those societies that function under strict Sharia; women are lower than…
Sandra Lee Smith

Take a closer look at those societies that function under strict Sharia; women are lower than livestock, which is also owned property, in them.

Yea…..that’s not accurate. Sharia is a mixed bag for women, primitive in some areas, rather forward-thinking in others. Some things that people don’t know:

  1. As a muslim woman, I have an absolute right to an education under Sharia. Nobody can say differently; if they do, they’re outside of the Law and acting out of medieval custom.
  2. As a betrothed woman, I have a hand in writing our marriage contract. If there’s something I want to make sure I have in my marriage (or not), I can write it in. So, if I want him to agree never to take a second wife, I can stick that in there. If I want to make sure he won’t whine if I want to get a job, I stick that in there. (And I have. Both examples.)
  3. As a betrothed woman, I get a dowry that’s negotiated between the parties. Once I get it, it’s mine, period, and its none of his business what I do with it. Since it’s easy to divorce me in Islam, you can think of this as an upfront lump sum alimony payment if he divorces me.
  4. As a muslim wife, if I work, the money I earn is 100% mine; the support of me, our children, and the home is on him. If I decide to help out with bills, or buy the kids things, it’s because I chose to do it; he’s not allowed to require it of me.
  5. ALso, if we divorce, Sharia requires child support. This wouldn’t occur in the west, because federal law supersedes religious law, but it’s there.

Obviously, there are things (well publicized things) that gave you the impression that we have no status under Islam. That’s simply not true; it’s more complicated than that. Yes, there are things that stick in your craw as medieval, but those don’t apply to those of us in the West who are “modern”. We don’t do them if they conflict with state/federal law, or unless we choose to do them out of tradition. (For example, I did let a male relative negotiate my wedding contract and dowry on my behalf. But he did it precisely the way I wanted him to do it. It was done out of nod for tradition and the desire not to annoy a new set of in-laws, not because I needed help.)

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