A grid of disability access symbols — access to low vision, sign language, access for hearing loss, accessible print, etc.
A grid of disability access symbols — access to low vision, sign language, access for hearing loss, accessible print, etc.
Disability access symbols; image credit (https://oae.stanford.edu/resources-faqs/disability-access-symbols)

How and why designers should think about accessibility.

Design for “Everyone”

Who do you design for? As designers, we aspire to create designs that have the potential to impact the world and people of all kinds of shapes, sizes, and backgrounds. Moreover, designers fixate on the importance of creating products that anyone can use; after all, usability is important, and designers must critically consider the efficacy of their products. Thus, inherent to design is the notion of “design for everyone” — that is, to create simple designs that “even your grandma can pickup and use!”

Junior designers (myself included) easily acknowledge and accept…

Kimberly Do

UX designer in training

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