All I know about life…

I learned from fiction.

And I do mean popular, mass-produced, accessible-to-all, fanfiction-generating, trope-ridden, deliciously lowbrow fiction.

Maybe that’s why I suck at this Life & Living™ thing. I’ve heard from varied sources that I’m reasonably skilled at giving sound advice in several subjects. However I’ve also heard, sometimes from the same sources, that I’m an Empathetic Catastrophe *— not only unable to relate, but also known to give (mostly) logical yet hilariously cold and socially oblivious advice. I trust both accounts of my counseling skills.

When it comes to my understanding of my own feelings, on the other hand, there is no dichotomy whatsoever. I am entirely clueless. Most of the time I don’t know what I’m feeling, or why, or what and why. One could say it’s the mark of the perfect subject for talk therapy, the kind of human being that would greatly benefit from someone leading them to self-awareness. Yet, in the unfortunate experiences I had with psychologists, I rarely gained any insight.

Fortunately, there is something that does help. And here we go back to the subject at hand — fiction. Yes, that deliciously lowbrow fiction I mentioned up there a minute ago. Analyzing the type of stories and characters I’m drawn to (and believe me they’re always basically the same), and the little stories and beings I clumsily write as a hobby, I slowly unravel my own thoughts. It’s not that they’re that complex, it’s just that I’m really that unaware.

With that in mind, I’ll be writing some thoughts on some specific characters and why they’re special to me. Since they’re quite a few, it’ll be a series, “AIKAL” (you’re smart enough to figure out what it means, I’m sure), which I’ll update… whenever.

Obligatory “stay tuned”: stay tuned.

AIKAL [1/∞]: Joneleth Irenicus

* Not to be confused with the Ultraviolet Catastrophe, which can be solved via quantization of energy and the adoption of a Planckian function as the representation of the spectral distribution function.

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