Gunfighters in Hell

So you want to read some Outlaw Comics and don’t know where to start. Don’t worry, your friendly neighborhood Sewer Mutant has you covered.

For better or worse, building an Outlaw Comics collection generally means haunting your local quarter bins or shelling out for back issues on sites like Lone Star Comics or eBay. But not everyone wants to do that. I was recently asked what Outlaw Comics I would recommend that are in print in trade paperback format. Fortunately, there are a few things you can get in trade paperback format:

  • The Crow This is one of the “Big…


While I was yacking with my new-found friends, the Amateur Creator’s Union was building its own little publishing empire. It started with a series of photocopied “ashcan” comics. Here the ACU played the role of print-on-demand/order fulfiller, not unlike Lulu or Amazon Kindle Direct. You could send in camera-ready pages and founder Shane Harper would list them for sale in the Portfolio newsletter. When an order for one came in, he’d photocopy it and send it out.

The first batch included The Id # 1 by Craig T. Lewis, Spider by Rhian Engel, Pack by Jay Prince, and Shane’s own…


I’ve been a professional journalist for more than a decade. I’ve covered big, powerful companies like Facebook, Google, and Comcast. I’ve written about serious allegations against the highest levels of Mexican government. I’ve pored over corporate financial disclosures. I’ve crawled LinkedIn to people to comment on their former employers. I’ve interviewed senators, governors, and more CEOs than I can count — including Jeff Bezos, who has at times been the world’s richest man. I’m used to spin, reluctant sources, and the age-old “no comment” mantra. But I’ve never felt like a reporter in a movie on the trail of some…


The cover of the second issue of the ACU’s newsletter, Portfolio, by Bill McEvoy.

One of the most important moments of my youth came one October day in 1993 when I spotted the following news story in Wizard magazine # 27:

The Amateur Creator’s Union, a new non-profit organization dedicated to [helping inexperienced comic book creators[ will allow new writers and artists to gain both practice and exposure.

“Without practice, you let your talents lie dormant and imprisoned within you,” states Shane Boothe, director of the A.C.U., in a press release. “But all the practice in the world will do you no good if no one ever sees your work.” […]

“Boothe says his…


From the very beginning, comics were dangerous. In the early-1900s, magazines like The Atlantic Monthly and Ladies Home Journal ran articles accusing comic strips, still a new addition to newspapers, of undermining literacy and encouraged children to disrespect their parents and the law. In the 1950s, crime and horror comics incited a full-blown moral panic as parents and church groups hosted comic book burnings, scant years after the defeat of the Nazis during World War II. Underground comix of the 1960s and 70s struggled with obscenity laws. …


The Outlaw Comics community lost one of its most important figures when Glen Hammonds passed away on February 13, 2020 after a three and a half year battle with pancreatic cancer.

Hammonds founded the comics mail order, wholesale, and publishing company Raw Comics. He coined the term “Outlaw Comics” in the early 1990s and popularized it through Raw Comics ads and his various writings. But more importantly, he was a tireless advocate and supporter of Outlaw Comics. Hammonds was, in a big way, a tastemaker and connector in the indie comics scene.

“I always talk with people about Glen’s undying…


Content warning: this article discusses comic books that portray violence, including sexual violence, in a graphic manner. I don’t describe these things in detail in this article (though might discuss them in more detail in future articles) and have tried to keep the illustrations relatively tame, but some do contain gore and sexually suggestive images.

From “Frame 137” by James O’Barr

As a kid I loved all comic books. Superman. Groo. Captain America: Return of the Asthma Monster. Anything so long as it had sequential art. As I approached my teens, however, I developed a strong preference for darker, more macabre comics. …

Klint Finley

Get the Medium app

A button that says 'Download on the App Store', and if clicked it will lead you to the iOS App store
A button that says 'Get it on, Google Play', and if clicked it will lead you to the Google Play store