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If bread were growing on trees, investors in a food industry would hardly need to calculate ROI thoroughly. Not because the sector would be too lucrative to calculate the ratio of income and expenditure but because any feasibility improvement would be senselessly redundant in such a case.

Batteries don’t grow on trees as well, but synthesizing energy metals from minerals may seem so explicitly straightforward for potential investors that some enhancements to the process look worthless. However, if it were that simple, no innovative approaches to a production of battery metals would appear. But they do.

The so-called “battery metals” are on the hype nowadays. The topic is becoming so viral that economists, environmental activists, and even celebrities from politics and show-business started to express their concerns over the post-industrial green economy where batteries would seem playing the same role as hydrocarbon played in the outgoing industrial era. …


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The Ocean bottom is the next frontier for both marine scientists and mineral miners. Since less than 15% of seabed have been mapped, we still have a great deal to learn about resources available deep underwater. But quite predictable environmental effects seem an obstacle.

In fact, we know more about Martian landscapes than about the floor of our Earth’s oceans. Water covers approximately 70% of the total Earth’s surface. …


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During the last decade, when the term “Gold Rush” having roots in the XIX century was appearing from time to time on the internet with regard to the upcoming seabed mining of “battery” minerals, the majority of observers could hardly take the term literally. It was an appropriate telling metaphor allowing to speculate about both the mineral treasures available on the ocean floor and hypothetical profits that mining companies could get from the actual seabed mining. Besides, the “Gold Rush” hinted at a certain anticipated contest which might occur between seabed mining companies.

The present post is not about an actual situation taking place in the contemporary seabed mining. This is about the legitimacy of using the “Gold Rush” term when it comes to the seabed minerals other than gold. …

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