Confession. I am perhaps one of the few Canadians who has no more than a passing interest in hockey. I understand the appeal of the country’s national sport, but I don’t find a great deal of enjoyment in watching it or, to be fair, watching any sport.

This fact does not make me any less of an unabashed champion of the Dskate Hockey program, which brings together children and youth with type 1 diabetes (T1D) at a week-long hockey camp to play a sport they love while learning to manage exercise and T1D. …


I admit that walking into the documentary, Killing Patient Zero, I was relatively unaware of the story of “Patient Zero” and the role he had inadvertently played in the AIDS epidemic. I knew from the movie’s description that he was a flight attendant who had been incorrectly blamed for bringing the disease to the U.S. I didn’t know that what I would watch was the unspooling of a series of scientific misunderstandings and blatant PR maneuvers that made one man a scapegoat, and in turn may have helped force the hand of those tasked with stopping this epidemic.

Walking out…


In 2018, I set about creating a reading list for stem cell scientists. I have always been fascinated by the books that inspire those who work in science and as the Director of Communications and Marketing for the Ontario Institute for Regenerative Medicine (OIRM), I had the opportunity to ask some of the world’s leading experts what had influenced their work.

It was quickly apparent from the OIRM reading list that science books were only part of the process — there were books on running a business (which a lab most certainly becomes), on self help and even some science…


Have you ever found yourself questioning if you can really push through? Whether it’s in work or in fitness or in any life challenge, sometimes there’s much we can learn by just not stopping.

In January, when I was registering for this year’s Yoga Conference in Toronto, there were dozens of classes with master yoga teachers I was itching to take. Finally, I narrowed it down to about 15 hours of practice over two days. …


I recently read Angela Duckworth’s Grit. It’s one of those books that made a huge splash when it was released, as it melded academic research with self help in the way Brene Brown has made so popular. Duckworth’s book is arguably more on the academic writing side of things as compared to Brown, but it was still an interesting read. It also left me questioning my own grit.

Duckworth hypothesizes that high-performing people tend to have more grit than natural talent. Hard work, she suggests, can be just as, if not more, important than a natural aptitude towards a certain…


Have you read Shonda Rhimes’ book, The Year of Yes? It’s a good read. Not surprisingly, Rhimes is a fabulous writer and the way she confronts her fear of attending events and saying yes to things that sound scary (like galas and parties and speaking engagements) is funny and relatable. Her year-long experiment to say yes more often was inspiring and engaging. And it’s exactly the opposite of the problem I find myself facing.

I need a Year of No. I have an incredible case of FOMO. My fear of missing out is all encompassing and, frankly, unmanageable. It’s why…


One of the things I’ve been cautioned about in writing a science-themed book is that science changes too quickly — what may be true today could be debunked tomorrow. This is a reasonable concern, but it’s equally true that the wheels of science can also move incredibly slowly. It’s all part of what makes the area so fascinating.

I started reading Dreams and Due Diligence by Joe Sornberger with this in mind. I wondered if it would still hold up more than seven years after its publication. I work daily in stem cell science and I know it’s an extremely…


While studying journalism in university, my required reading often included the type of long-form non-fiction I had rarely indulged in before starting the program. My personal reading in high school involved devouring Can-Lit novels, literary fiction and every back issue of Rolling Stone available in our school library. I was planning to become an entertainment journalist, so science writing never once crossed my mind or made it onto my reading list.

It was in university that I discovered the wonders of Oliver Sacks, whose vivid descriptions of medical cases were fascinating and so well-written that I found myself unable to…

Krista Lamb

Communications Director, Diabetes Canada Podcast host, science communicator, writer and wine lover.

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