Your MVP is taking too long

Look. I know you’re doing a good job, but how long have you been trying to prove your business model? For how long have you kept developing your software only to aquire average growth? Is the A/B software worth the cost?

If you aim to get your MVP done in 24 hours you need to plan for 2 hours. Or let me put it in a more realistic frame — 5 minutes.

If you plan to work on your MPV for 24 hours, like the radical startup world wants you to believe, you’ll end up working on it for a week. If you’ve got a job, it’ll be a months, which will turn into a year if you’re that naive.

So how do you prove your business model in like 5 minutes? Well what you need is a pitch. As I see it there are two kinds of pitches. One is a flashy “scroll through my fancy marketing material” that takes weeks to perfect. The other is a down to earth honest proposal written in text. Well, pretty text, but still.

You know what’s more important than validating the market? Actually getting to the people — so DO NOT spend any more time on your website than you absolutely have to, otherwise you lose marketing time. That is a long process in itself, that’s what you build the MVP for. Get the people to your site first — then start building a product.

Look, I’ve been an entrapeneur with software skills for 5 years now with variable success in a few companies. None of them really stuck as a service. I think one of the main problems has been not pivoting enough. If something in a company went well, we stuck to that without knowing why it worked. This is how assumptions mask themselves as validations. Our startup stagnated.

This time around I’m going to try a lot of ideas before jumping on board. So the 5 minutes rule for the MVP is a must. This time I’m doing it right.

Let’s get down to business.

Where do I pitch?

You could write your idea on a blog like Medium and hope for the best, but the reality is you need people to sign up for your idea and you really need to put your marketing skills to the test and not lie on a single source of viewers. Let’s be honest here, a blog is for blogging (get followers) and a domain is for a new kind of vision. Also, with a domain you make your intention clear about creating a product eventually. Just to be clear — having a blog on your domain is powerful, but I bet that’ll take you more than a few hours (which turns into days, into no time for content or marketing)!

Squarespace is awesome, but it takes long and costs over $10 a month to host. Try publishing 10 ideas on that platform. Unbounce is even more awesome if youve got a couple of porches laying around.

Shameless plug here guys, but I needed this tool and I made the extra effort to make it available to all. The analytics are basic, but so is the price. Go on, test drive your most creative ideas on markdownsites.com - I bet it’s the most simple website builder you’ve ever seen.

Thanks for reading, pick me apart in the comments :)

P.S. The service isn’t actually complete yet, leave a comment to let me know you need this!