Trip Report: A Journey into the Homeland of my Mind

I’m going back to Chicago this Turkey Day, which transports me back to the past, some of my early years. The grad school years. Time spent learning to program, making crafty things like recipe apps for my palm pilot os, and super ridiculous things like 3D bugs in rendering programs, amongst other code projects that just embarrass me to think about now. Seems weird that it’s been so long since that time and I’ve had countless corporate jobs where I’ve been, “held accountable” for “deliverables” and “action items” and there’s been all this “low hanging fruit”, “line items” and “task” completion.

All this time that has escaped from my black magic hat of tricks. I feel like all the experimenting and dreaming has faded into a pond of shallow water and even murkier memories. Sometimes though, there are bookmarks that reach out Interstellar-ing you back into some wormhole of time.

During grad school, I logged my weekends cleaning dinosaur bones at The Field Museum in Chicago. I found this Wired article particularly wonderful- showing history, timelines, and the start of something great —http://www.wired.com/2014/05/vintage-chicago-field-museum/#slide-id-628467

My favorite — A Babylonian hedgehog-shaped rattle from 550 B.C

These old photos show the collections that are perhaps no longer on public display, things hidden in the deep dark halls, dark wooden scaffolding and industrial revolution architecture. Things that McDonalds doesn’t spend 8 million dollars on to sponsor for display. Those subtle beauties of birds, and insects from another time.

What have I learned over this past decade or so of time?

Oddball things hide for awhile, but always emerge out of the vaults of time or reappear in your mind, those things corporations don’t value, well, they don’t disappear forever. The weirdness is always there, perhaps only appreciated by some, but documented like hedgehog rattles from 500 B.C. — things don’t go away, but appear and disappear regardless of time.

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