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Donald Trump and Xi Jinping at G20 Summit in Japan, 2019 (Photo Credit: White House)

In a Fox News interview, the host Steve Hilton asked the President of the United States Donald Trump if he will let China get away with its invasion or effective control of Taiwan. As usual, Trump gave an ambivalent answer on related issues: “I think it’s an inappropriate place to talk about it, but China knows what I’m gonna do. China knows.”

Like all ambiguous rhetoric, this line is not directional and does not suggest any likely change in Trump’s Taiwan policy. Without overinterpreting Trump’s remarks, the signal behind them in this interview shows a consistent attitude Trump has toward…


To understand a possible President Biden’s China approach, we need to look at the views of his likely advisers.

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President Barack Obama talks with Vice President Joe Biden, National Security Advisor Tom Donilon, center, and the Vice President’s National Security Advisor Tony Blinken (Photo: The White House)

In a previous article on The Diplomat, I reviewed former United States Vice President Joe Biden’s past position on Taiwan-related issues. Decades of experience in the Senate Foreign Relations Committee made Biden one of the core foreign policy advisers to President Barack Obama. As a U.S. presidential hopeful, Biden, despite being a foreign policy hand himself, still needs assistance from other advisers. …


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Mr. Lam Wing-kee (right) and Taiwan’s Speaker of the Legislative Yuan Yu Shyi-kun (left) (Photo: Now News)

In the film Casablanca, a scene becomes epic when the voice of French refugees singing the French anthem “La Marseillaise” and chanting “Vive la France” drowns out the German march sung by Nazi officers.

In real life, something similar happened in Taiwan. Lam Wing-kee (林榮基), the former owner of Causeway Bay Books in Hong Kong, reopens his business in Taipei on April 25. His last bookstore in Hong Kong was forced to shut down for the sale of banned books about the secrets among the leadership of the Chinese Communist Party (CCP). Mr. Lam and the other four stakeholders of…


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WHO Director-General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus (Photo: Getty Images)

In an April 8 news conference, WHO Director-General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus accused Taiwan and the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of backing death threats and a racist campaign against him and “the whole black community.”

The ministry refuted the claims immediately, calling Tedros’ accusations “unfounded” and “seriously misleading to the international community.”

President Tsai Ing-wen (蔡英文) also openly invited Tedros to visit the nation and see the efforts of Taiwanese — the “true victims of unfair treatment” — in combating COVID-19.

US Senator Robert Menendez, the ranking member of the Senate Committee on Foreign Relations, echoed Tsai’s views that Taiwan should…


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Taiwan Vice President-elect William Lai (Right) and US House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (Photo: William Lai’s Facebook)

As the world is combating the spread of COVID-19, international media have noticed Taiwan’s outstanding measures in disease prevention and control. Another noticeable point is the little role the World Health Organization (WHO) plays in helping Taiwan to address the coronavirus crisis due to the organization’s exclusion of Taiwan under the pressure from the People’s Republic of China (PRC). Meanwhile, Taiwan continues to feel the security threat from China when the Chinese People’s Liberation Army (PLA) continues to send military aircraft and warships to areas near Taiwan for military drills. …


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Sen. Cory Gardner and President Tsai Ing-wen (Photo: Office of the President)

Amidst the prevalent crisis of COVID-19, a bill called “Taiwan Allies International Protection and Enhancement Initiative (TAIPEI) Act,” introduced by Senator Cory Gardner of Colorado, was signed into law by President Donald Trump on March 26. At first sight, a global pandemic that causes tens of thousands of deaths seems irrelevant to a U.S. law that supports Taiwan’s broader international space. Yet the TAIPEI Act can be the harbinger of the opportunities both for Taiwan and for the world to work collectively to resolve global challenges regardless of the Chinese interference of Realpolitik.

There has been a debate between China…


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Chen Shih-chung, Taiwan’s Minister of Health and Welfare(Photo: CNA)

With the outbreak of the COVID-19, there is also a great struggle of narrative between China and many other countries on the origin of the virus. From a cartoon of a Danish newspaper, the covers of Economist and TIME, to a Wall Street Journal commentary piece titled “China Is the Real Sick Man of Asia,” or even the once commonly used term “Wuhan coronavirus,” international media have made clear that China is the origin of the coronavirus outbreak. …


(原文於2018年11月14日刊載於讀報)

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孟昭文(Source: Thomas Altfather Good)

此次美國期中選舉中,許多台美人在聯邦及州層級的議會選舉當選,另不少台灣人感到鼓舞。然而作為台裔後代的議員,真的會比其他非台裔議員還更支持與台灣相關的法案嗎?答案或許並不盡然。而就算一位議員沒有台灣經驗,共享的價值仍可能成為其支持友台政策的重要因素。


For decades, Biden has embraced the “China engagement” doctrine and warned Taiwan to tread carefully. Now, though, he seems to have changed his tune.

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Source: Gage Skidmore

In the latest presidential primary debate of the Democratic Party, on February 25, former Vice President Joe Biden showed his assertiveness toward Xi Jinping, the head of state of the People’s Republic of China (PRC). Biden blasted Xi as a “thug” who “has a million Uighurs in ‘reconstruction camps,’ meaning concentration camps.” …


Putting a recent “60 Minutes” bombshell into context from the senator’s long legislative history with Taiwan.

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Source: Bernie Sanders

Senator Bernie Sanders is famed for his “Democratic Socialism” platform that highlight domestic policies, including Medicare for All, the Green New Deal, College for All, and so on. However, since the last Democratic Primary against former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton in 2016, Sanders has frequently been asked to expand on his foreign policy views as well.

A recent interview on CBS’s “60 Minutes” may be the first time the general public heard Sanders talk at length about his views on many foreign policy…

Yang Kuang-shun 楊光舜

International relations, Taiwan, US, China

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