Introducing What if Wednesday

It’s no surprise that research shows Wednesdays rank low for both happiness and productivity (even lower than Mondays), but what if you could transform the midweek blahs into the best day of the week? And what if your company culture could create that midweek magic?

At Pinterest, we believe asking yourself what if and trying something new can be transformative, and it’s core to our mission of helping people discover and do things they love. That’s why we’re launching What if Wednesday — a new program to turn the weekday slump day into a day of trying something new.

The program will come to life in a variety of ways — through media partnerships, including weekly features in the New York Times Daily Briefing on Wednesdays, and also through influencers who’ll be sharing their tries using #whatifwednesday.

But most importantly, we’re committed to bringing this program to life internally. We want the what if spirit to be the heart of working at Pinterest, so each (no meeting) Wednesday, we’re creating fun pop-up activations around the office to get employees away from their desks and trying new things. We’re asking everyone at the company to write down their own personal what ifs, which we’ll mail back to them later, and then pair up for accountability. To help bring those ideas to life, we’re launching What if awards to help fund employees who want to take the leap and try something new — anything from an educational class to an offline adventure. Our first batch of award winners are trying everything from aerial yoga and bioluminescence kayaking, to building a ham radio and beginning martial arts. But the best embodiment of midweek magic is KnitCon, our annual two-day, laptops-down internal conference of sharing secret talents, from hula dance to keeping houseplants alive. It’s the best try-new-things time of year at Pinterest.

Here’s to adding some magic to your midweek and trying new things on #whatifwednesday!

— Kurt Serrano, SVP, People, currently saving ideas to Baking

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