Designing Justice

What words can’t say, design can — nothing could explain this better than a visit to Luba Lukova’s exhibition. Luba, a New York based Bulgarian graphic artist uses metaphors, juxtaposition of symbols, very few lines and text to bring out the most basic essence of humanity. I happened to stumble at one of her exhibitions at MODA in Atlanta last month.

Her posters provoke you to think and expose the injustice worldwide. Luba’s posters finely reflect on the human behaviour, hypocrisy and injustice. Something that really struck me were her series of posters on women inequality. Luba designed these posters when one of her Iranian followers asked her to address the issue of women rights in Muslim world. In this series she created images which showed how the everyday situations are different for men and women. The artist stayed away from the image used in western feminist posters, depicting women fighting for equality. I am sharing pictures from this particular series -

Another design called — Sudan, was designed by her when she watched a documentary about the impoverished country. Right after the documentary there was a commercial break promoting low calorie food. This made Luba design the poster below, throwing light on the striking contrast -

Another one depicting income gap -

Lukova’s powerful and brilliant posters are minimalistic but highlight the critical social justice issues that currently dominate us, including health care, women’s rights, LGBT rights, immigration, corruption and gentrification.

Check out more of her work here and here.

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