An Africa without borders. An Africa where people, goods and services move around freely from country to country. Each nation satisfying the needs of the other in a spirit of mutual benefit and cooperation. The lofty dream of Pan-African icons such as Kwame Nkrumah, Thomas Sankara, Julius Nyere and Haile Selassie.

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However, nearly half a century after the passing of these great men, the dream is very far from the reality.

In Africa today, citizens of the Republic of Congo need a visa to enter into the neighbouring Democratic Republic of Congo, even though citizens of Singapore, Haiti and the tiny islands of Micronesia need only a plane ticket and a valid passport. Only 17% of all international trade by African nations is with other African nations — a sharp contrast to the situation in Asia where 50% of all trade is between Asian countries and Europe where the same figure is around 70%. Moving goods on a 1,500km journey from Doula in Cameroon to N’Djamena in neighbouring Chad, costs 6 times more money than moving those same goods12,000km from Doula to Hong-Kong. …

West Africa’s New Currency: The End of France’s dominance in Africa?

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Just over 30 years after the idea was initially conceived, it appears that the whole of West Africa will now be adopting one currency. On the 29th of June 2019, the leaders of the 15 countries that make up the Economic community of West African states (ECOWAS) agreed to adopt the “Eco” as their new single currency. If all goes to plan, the existing national currencies of all of the countries in the region will be replaced by the Eco by as early as next year.

Perhaps the most significant effect of this new policy is that it will mark the end of the Franc CFA, the currency used by 8 of the 15 ECOWAS member states. The subject of many debates, protests and political speeches, the Franc CFA is seen by many as not just a relic of French colonialism in Africa, but a strategic tool used by the French government to maintain dominance over its former colonies. …

China in Africa, What’s really going on?

For much of modern history, the African continent has been the perfect hunting ground for all kinds of exploiters, criminals and racketeers. Some of the culprits have been indigenous, others foreign, but both with an eye for opportunity and an insatiable appetite for plunder. The Arab and trans-Atlantic slave trade, European colonialism, post-independence kleptocractic governments, and La Françafrique are all but a few illustrative examples. But according to some, the People’s Republic of China is the new villain in the tumultuous African story.

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Over the last couple of decades, China has steadily increased its economic ties with Africa and is now one of the continent’s single most important economic partners. From roads, to railways, energy infrastructure and manufacturing plants, Chinese money and resources are flowing into the African continent like never before. Chinese firms of all sizes are bringing serious capital investment, technical know-how, and entrepreneurial energy to every corner of the African continent. According to the China Investment Global Tracker, Chinese investments and contracts in sub-Saharan Africa over the period spanning 2005 to 2018 amounted to a total of $299 billion, with the Chinese president Xi Jinping also recently pledging to invest a further $60 billion into African projects over the next few years. …

The 100 day period from early-April to mid-July 1994 would go down as one of the darkest periods in human history. The Republic of Rwanda, a small landlocked nation situated in the heart of the African continent, became the scene of a mass-murder as tribal warfare between the Hutus and the Tutsis resulted in the deaths of an estimated 800,000 Rwandans.

Fast forward a couple of decades and the Rwandan story is one of remarkable economic development. The nation has been completely transformed from utter ruin into a shining example of African growth and stability; between 2010 and 2011, Rwandan GDP reached a record 8.2% and the poverty rate dropped by 57% with over a million Rwandans pulled out of poverty. …

The 100 day period from early-April to mid-July 1994 would go down as one of the darkest periods in human history. The Republic of Rwanda, a small landlocked nation situated in the heart of the African continent, became the scene of a mass-murder as tribal warfare between the Hutus and the Tutsis resulted in the deaths of an estimated 800,000 Rwandans.

Fast forward a couple of decades and the Rwandan story is one of remarkable economic development. The nation has been completely transformed from utter ruin into a shining example of African growth and stability; between 2010 and 2011, Rwandan GDP reached a record 8.2% and the poverty rate dropped by 57% with over a million Rwandans pulled out of poverty. …

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​Jimi Solanke, the late Nigerian folklorist. Photo: tosingersblog.com

A bit of an inflammatory title I know, but please read on with an open mind.

Recent studies have shown a steady decline in the use of indigenous African languages, especially among middle to upper-class African millennials and post-millenials (Generation Z). If the stats are to be believed, then the next generation of business leaders, academics and politicians in countries like Ghana, Nigeria and Kenya will speak English as a first, and perhaps only language.

Many are alarmed by this prospect, denouncing it as a loss of culture and ethnic identity which must be stopped at all costs. Various suggestions have been put forward ranging from the implementation of revised school curriculums, to the promotion of indigenous languages in mass media, and even the launching of grass-root campaigns aimed at encouraging parents to speak native languages to their children. …

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​Jimi Solanke, the late Nigerian folklorist. Photo: tosingersblog.com

A bit of an inflammatory title I know, but please read on with an open mind.

Recent studies have shown a steady decline in the use of indigenous African languages, especially among middle to upper-class African millennials and post-millenials (Generation Z). If the stats are to be believed, then the next generation of business leaders, academics and politicians in countries like Ghana, Nigeria and Kenya will speak English as a first, and perhaps only language.

Many are alarmed by this prospect, denouncing it as a loss of culture and ethnic identity which must be stopped at all costs. Various suggestions have been put forward ranging from the implementation of revised school curriculums, to the promotion of indigenous languages in mass media, and even the launching of grass-root campaigns aimed at encouraging parents to speak native languages to their children. …

Tito Prince

Prince
God
Es-tu prêt?
[Are you ready?]
Comme tu m’as fait God [just as you made me God]
Va conquérir les nations et terrasser les ennemis [Go conquer the nations and bring down the nations]
Ma grande gloire est sur toi [My great glory is upon you]
Maintenant ? [now]
Va mon fils, va [go my son, go]

[Pont] [Bridge]
Je les cherche [i’m searching for them]
Je les cherche [i’m searching for them]
Je les cherche [i’m searching for them]
Il me supplie de pas l’abattre [they begged me not to slaughter them]
Lui et sa bande de petits démons, démons [him and his group of little demons, demons]
Mais j’suis grand de taille, donc je les cherche [ but i’m large in size, so I’m searching for them]
Mais vous êtes [but you are]
Il me supplie de pas l’abattre[they begged me not to slaughter…

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Nana Akufo-Addo. Photo Credit: facebook.com/anakufoaddo

Original article by André Silva Konan for Jeuneafrique.com

L’article original par André Silva Konan pour Jeunafrique.com

Ghana: un an après l’élection de Nana Akufo-Addo, embellie [upturn] générale sur l’économie du pays

Ghana: One year after the election of Nana Akufo-Addo, there is a general upturn in the economy of the country.

Un taux de croissance [growth rate] en hausse, une inflation en recul [down, reducing] et une balance commerciale [trade balance] dopée [boosted] par les exportations d’or et de pétrole. L’économie du Ghana se porte relativement mieux, en dépit [despite] du déficit budgétaire.

A growth rate on the rise, inflation falling and a trade balance boosted by the exportation of gold and petrol. …

About

K.B. Taiwo

Nigerian-Ghanaian. Thinking out loud about personal growth, policy & the African experience.

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