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Contributing Writer ~ Danielle Joy Holcombe

I make my living as a secretary. Some aspects of my job I like better than others. I enjoy formatting documents because there can be a bit of a puzzle aspect to it and I LOVE to solve a puzzle. The other day a coworker asked me to help them figure out what was wrong in their Word document. They only had text on half the page, and then the rest of their document was on the next page. The first thing I did was turn on the “Show/Hide ¶” option which then shows paragraph markers and other hidden symbols. Helping my coworker fix their document was easy now, and easy for me to show them where the problem was. I liken it to an x-ray in a way. …


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By Radha Lath

For the first time, we have signed up for a CSA farm share. Once a week, my husband goes to pick it up, and then we have to put in some time to scrub all the dirt off everything, especially the greens. It’s mind altering how good everything tastes when it’s fresh and local. We do shop at the local farmer’s market every year, but something about finding ways to use up stuff you might not have picked out yourself is very character building. We had exactly zero thoughts on how to use garlic scapes, but my idea was to make a paste out of them, and use it for cooking, just like garlic paste (except a vibrant green) from the Indian store. …


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Contributing Writer ~ Danielle Joy Holcombe

When I was a single adult in my 20’s, I was heavily involved in my church. I sought out opportunities to be in leadership roles in the adult single’s group there. I had some very close friendships, but mostly among the rest of the small leadership group. My relationship with much of that community ~ who I was supposed to be serving ~ was pretty superficial.

Then I got pregnant. Still single…..still heavily involved in church and leadership there, but now marred by a sin that I could not hide. Because of my role in the group, I felt it was important to speak to them as a group. Confess if you will. …


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Contributing Writer ~ Danielle Joy Holcombe

I’m sitting in my gazebo looking out over my yard. There are big trees and flower beds. There is food for birds here — both in feeders I fill and in the fertile ground where we grow all manner of things. The birds perch on my fence for a moment as they swish and swoop between yards. To them the fence is not a barrier. It is merely a place to light for a spell as they move throughout their much larger domain.

But what is my fence, to me? Protection? A stamp marking this yard as my own? It defines my land as something to defend; and with defense, justification of violence quickly follows. Maybe the fence is even a status symbol ~ of something I have accomplished. Something I can measure, and measure others against. …


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Contributing writer ~ Marlise Flores Boedeker

I wrote this after a particularly trying day. Being at the end of my third pregnancy, I am wholly tapped out some days. My children still needed me, and I was not holding them. I was clenching hard when I saw Lace taking her time, love, and attention to walk with someone who was being particularly challenging. I was reminded of *why* holding another is a skill that is worth practicing. And that…well…it requires practice.

Reflecting now, I am hyper aware how often I demand BIPOC to hold me. Not just relationally as an adult, but as an infant. Someone who does not have the skills to hold them back, AND who couldn’t possibly be expected to learn those skills. I expect to have everything done for me, while I get all the nutritive benefits I am sucking away. …


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Contributing Writer ~ Marlise Flores Boedeker

Welcome to my kitchen table. I’ve got a pot of coffee brewing, and assorted mugs for you to choose from. I also have a key lime pie but this is your warning that it is tart.

We need to talk about the white art of misdirection. We are literally killing BIPOC with our designed magic tricks. The misdirection? While we saw a Black person in half, we get the audience to feel bad for our exhaustion from grinding a saw back and forth.

Let’s talk about the misdirection act we pull when we waltz into spaces designed to make anti-racism a part of our every day lives. …


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By Dr. Selika Ducksworth Lawton

Contributing Writer

Dr. Selika Ducksworth Lawton is currently a Professor of history at University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire. Dr. Ducksworth-Lawton is a specialist in Twentieth-Century African American Military, National Security, and Civil Rights History. She works in the intersection of race, national security, civil rights, and protest. Her book, Honorable Men: Armed Self Defense and the Deacons for Defense and Justice, is under contract with University Press of Mississippi and expected in press early next year. Honorable Men describes how African Americans veterans in the Deacons for Defense and Justice combined their military service knowledge with an African American vision of republicanism and citizenship to create a militia in Louisiana that successfully fought the Klan in the 1965–8 activists and protects white and African American Congress of Racial Equality activists. Dr. Ducksworth Lawton is the co-author of Minority and Gender Differences in Officer Career Progression. She is working on a new book on the impact of culture and geography on the activists’ choices between non-violence and armed self-defense in several states in 1964–1967. …


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Contributing Writer ~ Marlise Flores Boedeker

White violence.

What images does that elicit? What circumstances come to mind?

Are you included in any of them?

I doubt it, simply because it takes cognitive effort to recognize how we as white people are armed with violent weapons in our every day thoughts, actions, and communications.

I want to think I am different from “those people” who commit atrocities.

Question, is it more atrocious to kill someone quickly or slowly? Because we are suffocating Black people.

Which leads me to sharing this video by Sterling K. Brown.

I share this carefully. I don’t share it so we white people can steal the pain for ourselves and cry/feel heartbreak/grieve what isn’t ours to grieve. …


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This is what integrity and congruence looks like.

https://www.tbray.org/ongoing/When/202x/2020/04/29/Leaving-Amazon#p-3

Preemptive: Yes, I know that there are some built-in advantages and privileges that the author has that a lot of us as working-class and middle-class people do not. At the salary he’s alluding to he probably has a sizeable nest egg, and he also probably has Amazon stock that I would be doubtful that he is selling off.

That does not diminish the public stance that he took by stepping down from a coveted position in what is the most powerful Corporation in the world.

This all turns on the three things we talk about all the…


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When white people have, as they have since the whole Dem race shook out, agonized over what they should do, or more often, wanted to know about black voter behavior, what I say first and foremost is: the first thing to do is ask us.

This is not just about how politics play out, although politics informs policy and public opinion, attitudes, biases, and behavior.

We could take a look at each of those as discrete units, but for the sake of brevity, let’s lump them together for this discussion.

In a lot of workplaces, leaders are leaders until they actually have to make decisions. Then you see endless meetings, and edicts written by committee, and no one wanting to actually stand up, risk, and do what has to be done, until they absolutely have to. …

About

Lace on Race

Lace Watkins Founder of Lace on Race

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