by Jen Katanoutant and Siwakorn odacho

All photographs — Siwakorn Odochao and the Ban Nong Tao community

In Northern Thailand, the Pgak’yau (Karen) community believe that humans and Earth need each other. Nature cannot host humans if we don’t take care of the land. They maintain that spiritual connection through rotational farming — a system in which forest plots are cleared, burned, cropped, and then allowed to remain fallow. During the fallow period, which lasts for 8 to 10 years, perennial crops continue to be managed and harvested as the forests grows. In this self sustaining cycle, communities grow food while the forest regenerates — allowing both to host each other.

In Walk Like A Bee, Siwakorn Odochao and the Ban Nong Tao community share snapshots of rotational farming from their hills.

Ban Nong Tao, the site of Walk Like a Bee research, is surrounded by lush forests and rocky mountain faces.
Ban Nong Tao, the site of Walk Like a Bee research, is surrounded by lush forests and rocky mountain faces.

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Land Body Ecologies

Land Body Ecologies

We are an interdisciplinary network seeking to understand lived experiences of land trauma among marginalised communities. Wellcome Trust 2021 Hub Award.

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